#1
I've decided I'm going to record a grunge album for my solo project. A problem I'm having, however, is figuring out how to write it since pegging down specifics of what grunge is would be difficult and I'm not sure how to do it without stepping over the line seperating it into "punk" or "metal" . So far I know a lot of the chord progressions tend to be somewhat dissonant at times and that a chorus effect is typically used at some point during a lot of songs (though I know I'm not supposed to have it on all the time). That being said, can anyone offer some advice as to basic things to try? Chord progressions, techniques for solos, etc.?
#2
thats like being a doctor and no knowing your big toe from your pelvis...
try listening to grunge music to get an idea???
no more about what you wanna do before jumping into it
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#3
Quote by Timothy O.
A problem I'm having, however, is figuring out how to write it since pegging down specifics of what grunge is would be difficult and I'm not sure how to do it without stepping over the line seperating it into "punk" or "metal" . So far I know a lot of the chord progressions tend to be somewhat dissonant at times and that a chorus effect is typically used at some point during a lot of songs (though I know I'm not supposed to have it on all the time). That being said, can anyone offer some advice as to basic things to try? Chord progressions, techniques for solos, etc.?


Listen to Nirvana and listen to how they did it, get some ideas
#4
I don't think there is much of a distinction between what is grunge and what is grunge/alternate rock/punk/metal in a lot of cases, except where and when it was made.
Call me Batman.
#5
In Grunge, major or minor tonality under distortion = good. Major or minor tonality under distortion and wah = better.
#7
I don't think the chorus effect matters, but you should pay attention to the quiet/loud dynamic of the songs. The verses are usually just drum & bass, lyrics deliberately boring. Then loud noisy guitars come in on the chorus, and that's also where the lyrics "hook" is.
#8
-Disinterested vocals.
-Noisy guitars. A fuzzbox is a must.
-Dissonant harmonies
-Very little focus on lead guitar; powerchords used for rhythm guitar
-Quiet/Loud/Quiet/Loud dynamics; minimal use of guitar during "quiet" segments; arpeggios, clean guitar lines, or no guitar at all.
-Unpoetic lyrics

Listen to a lot of early Dinosaur Jr, Late 80s/early 90's Sonic Youth, Nirvana (particulary "In Utero"), late 80's Mudhoney, Babes in Toyland.
Don't listen to Alice in Chains or Pearl Jam; the first leans too much toward heavy metal; the other is just a classic rock band, but with mud.
The difference between punk and grunge is minimal. You'll find several grunge bands are often referred to as punk bands, and early 90's punk bands are sometimes lumped in with grunge.
#9
Write the songs. Record them how you think they'll sound best and based on what you want to and like to hear. Don't try to force them into a box that you're not all that comfortable with yourself.

What you're asking is kinda like "how do I pick up Jewish girls if I'm a Hindu?" If you're Hindu, then do Hindu things and you'll probably wind up meeting a Hindu girl who you really connect with. You'll be happier in the long run.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
As far as soloing is concerned, the de facto standard of grunge music is the dissonant "Anti-solo", a la Cobain. Just **** around on the high frets with the tiny strings+ feedback is a must.