#1
I have no idea what I'm doing wrong, but my high E keeps either snapping off at the bridge, or pulling out of the ball end. The original plastic ball end split (italian strings, D'orazio ball end nylon) so I tied it to a bead. The bead worked fine for a week or so, then today it just snapped, didn't pull out of the bead, just snapped at the bridge. Should I use a different brand? Or is my technique just wrong? All the other strings are fine...
#2
sounds like you have a spur or somethin in the bridge. It's probably not the strings or your technique at all.
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#4
Hold up.

Are you playing a steel string guitar? or a nylon string guitar?
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#5
Quote by captivate
Hold up.

Are you playing a steel string guitar? or a nylon string guitar?


Nylon... it's a classical guitar.
#6
Then why do you have ball ended strings? They should really be tied onto the bridge in the traditional manner.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#7
Quote by captivate
Then why do you have ball ended strings? They should really be tied onto the bridge in the traditional manner.


Because they were made that way, and they are quicker/easier to restring. They seem to stay in tune better, though I'm not sure if the quality is that great since I'm no expert.
#8
Classical strings are going to brake if there not tied on, nylon is weaker, its just your bridge cutting into your e string which is the weakest.

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#9
Quote by Jiggzy.UK
Classical strings are going to brake if there not tied on, nylon is weaker, its just your bridge cutting into your e string which is the weakest.


This is what I also think may be happening.

Try tying them on the normal way and see if they break. Nylon strings need a week or two of solid playing before they fully stretch out(don't use any pre-stretching methods that you would use with a steel string because the nylon strings will break). Once they stretch out, they'll stay in tune for ages.

Nylon strings retain their tone for much longer than steel strings. You shouldn't need to change them more than 3 or 4 times a year at most. Although, I'm not a classical player, so I may be wrong on that.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#10
Quote by captivate
This is what I also think may be happening.

Try tying them on the normal way and see if they break. Nylon strings need a week or two of solid playing before they fully stretch out(don't use any pre-stretching methods that you would use with a steel string because the nylon strings will break). Once they stretch out, they'll stay in tune for ages.

Nylon strings retain their tone for much longer than steel strings. You shouldn't need to change them more than 3 or 4 times a year at most. Although, I'm not a classical player, so I may be wrong on that.


Thanks, I just tied it on the normal way. Is reusing the same string a good idea?
I play a lot so I change strings every 3 or three months when they get grimy.
#11
Should be ok. If it breaks again, try another brand like Savarez.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.