#1
I've been a bit stuck recently.

I'm really good at learning rhythm guitar and can pick up most lead guitar fairly quickly but I'm having real trouble with learning solos which is fairly irritating to be honest.

The weird thing is I'm fine with playing fast I just can't seem to learn and play solos from actual songs rather than improv stuff. Anyone have any tips for me?
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#3
start with solos that are really easy and build it up

also, use a metronome
#5
Try learning the solos slow, like one measure at a time. It took me 2 months to learn the Crazy Train solo without messing it up. I really like rhythm though, I leave the solos to my buddy :P.

Its just a matter of time and patience and getting your fingers used to flying all over the place. Just keep at it and everything should fall into place in due time.
#7
Quote by VoiceOfMonotony
I've been a bit stuck recently.

I'm really good at learning rhythm guitar and can pick up most lead guitar fairly quickly but I'm having real trouble with learning solos which is fairly irritating to be honest.

The weird thing is I'm fine with playing fast I just can't seem to learn and play solos from actual songs rather than improv stuff. Anyone have any tips for me?

Are you really "fine with playing fast", or do you just kid yourself that you are and in reality just flail at random notes following scale patterns you've drilled.

I suspect that's the case, because ultimately it's not possible to play properly at high speed until you can first play properly at slow speeds.

In short, stop kidding yourself that you're better than you are, slow down and focus on playing things accurately and controlled. It also sounds like you're "expecting" to be able to simply play stuff rather than understanding that you have to put in a fair bit of donkey work and practice to nail a solo, particularly if you're not used to playing them.

Try Highway to Hell by AC/DC, that's easy enough. Listen to the song and learn all the rhythm parts, then listen to the solo over and over until you can recall it note for note in your head...then and only then should you actually attempt to learn to play the solo, and that really goes for anything. The solo has natural pauses in it so use those to break it into sections and concentrate on learning to play the notes it contains accurately, controlled and in time before you worry about playing it at full speed.
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#8
Listen to the track. A lot. Its a lot easier if you know what its meant to sound like

Break the solo down into phrases, and slow it right down until you can play it accurately, then gradually let yourself speed up. It helps me a lot if I know what scale's been primarily used for the solo too, cos then I've got a better idea of whats coming next and how it fits together.
#9
If you're looking to start off slow, VoiceofMonotony, try the Every Rose Has It's Thorn solo. Its got its fast parts, and it has its slow bends and slides. It's very fun to play, and i've never found anyone who didn't like the song.

Goodluck!
#10
I agree, make sure you've listened to the song enough to sing out/hum the notes in the solo. Also, try to find accurate tabs for whatever solo you're playing, if you're not given the proper tools to start with, your product wont be spectacular, tab ratings are generally pretty indicative of accuracy. However, you may eventually start tabbing out solos yourself, don't try to tackle anything too difficult too quickly. Many solos are built using some variation of the blues or minor/major pentatonic scales, learn how they're formulated and how to apply that to the fretboard. Take things slow, playing slow but accurate sounds a thousand times better than playing 16th notes at 180 bpm and missing every other note.