#1
Bear in my I know no Music theory, dont really have the time to learn at the moment, I'm trying to learn the notes on the fretboard though I kinda kno the E and D strings.

When I'm walking home from school I come up with awesome riffs in my head. I come straight home and sit down on my guitar....and find myself unable to write anything. I try playing stuff but it sounds nothing like what I had in my head....

Why is this, do I need to start learning music theory and stuff?
#2
just try and play what you hear in your head on guitar. find out what notes you hear one by one and then play. just learning some scales might help
#5
Yes, learn music theory. It's not that hard, providing you are motivated and put it into practice. You'll notice almost immediate improvement, trust me.
#6
Aural training is key, and part of theory TBH. Your going to have to get into theory.

You can either struggle without it and come to the same conclusion or use theory and get there faster.

In all honesty if you just memorize the sound of the intervals you can play most stuff you hear, you just have to find the tonic.
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#7
Train your ear. When you listen to music, don't let it wash over you, actually listen. Try to hear how each part is moving, how far up, how far down, get used to the sounds. You can also go on www.musictheory.net and use the ear trainer there. Eventually you will learn what each interval sounds like and be able to play what you hear in your head.

I highly suggest learning as much music theory as possible.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#8
If you know what each note sounds like, and know the notes on the guitar, it really shouldnt be that hard at all to play whats in your head, right?
#9
Easy as pie.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#10
Quote by Redwingsrock
If you know what each note sounds like, and know the notes on the guitar, it really shouldnt be that hard at all to play whats in your head, right?


No, cos I dont know what any notes sound like.

Are there any sties which will play a note, then ask me to say what note it is, that might help me?
#11
That's insanely hard. Most people need a reference note, so I play an E, then play another note and ask you what it is, and you can learn to know. What you mentioned has been debated over forever and I have yet to see anyone prove either side of the argument.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#12
TBH if you want to play what is in your head, a high level of interval training, while it will help and I think you should do it, isn't entirely necessary.

What you do is this:
1. Get the riff in your head (don't forget it)
2. Think about the first note in the riff, find that note on your guitar.
3. Listen to the second note, is it higher or lower than the first?
4. Play notes that are higher/lower till you find the right one.
5. Do this for the rest of the riff and write the notes (notation, tab, whatever you want) down as you go.
6. You are done!
#13
If you learn theory, you can attach words to your idea. Rather than thinking "dee dee dee deh dah", you could be thinking "4/4 syncopated natural minor ascending" or something.
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#14
Quote by EndTheRapture51
When I'm walking home from school I come up with awesome riffs in my head. I come straight home and sit down on my guitar....and find myself unable to write anything.
You could get yourself a cheap recorder. And sing or hum the parts you come up with. It won't sound great, but at least you'll have something to remember.