#2
Because they are all the same notes. If you play the first pattern you play the notes G A# C D and F, in that order. If you play the second pattern you start on the second note of the scale, so you play A# first, then C D F and G. So they are all the same notes, just played starting on a different note.

Hope that helps
#3
no it's not a mistake, the G pentatonic is just a scale with five notes? yes, so this scale can be played anywhere not just the first position.

G A# C D F G is the scale (use the first position to determine that.

the other positions are just the same scale but they start on a different note, if you wanna think about it the second position is just a modal scacle of the G pentatonic but that just complicates things in the early stages.

The same goes for any penatonic you can use the different patterns, there are 5 of them if you dont know all starting with the different notes in that scale. basicaly idf you learn the 5 patterns ull be able to pick out every note in any penatonic scale, with ease.
#6
Quote by mmnohmygod
http://www.blueslessons.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=133&Itemid=84


I know why the first pentatonic pattern is in G but if you go into the other ones it says they're all in G. Even though the second pattern starts on the 6th fret, etc. Is this a mistake or am I missing something?



Visualize playing the scale along one string instead of climbing up a string every other note. For instance, you can get to that C by sliding up to the 8th fret of the E string instead of moving to the A string, 3rd fret.
Now, visualize how this concept plays out on every string, all the way down the neck, and you should be able to understand how you can play in key from pretty much any position.
#7
Quote by blueriver
G minor pentatonic has a Bb, not an A#. Yes it matters.

sorry to be a thread jacker, but what the hell does it matter, i never realized it did lol, and yes i do have a bit of theory under my belt, im not like just starting, but what does it matter if its the same note?
#8
Quote by eberg2
sorry to be a thread jacker, but what the hell does it matter, i never realized it did lol, and yes i do have a bit of theory under my belt, im not like just starting, but what does it matter if its the same note?


It isn't the same note, G to A# is an augmented second, G to Bb is a minor third.
#9
it's the same pitch or tone but a different note.

An A# is an A raised a half step. Bb is a B lowered a half step.

In the G scale A# is a major second(A) raised a half step to an augmented second(A#).
What we have in this scale is a major third(B) lowered a half step to a minor third(Bb).

To the thread starter...Get a blank fretboard and write out all the notes contained in the scale across the whole fretboard.
Then imagine you are going to chop it into sections where each finger of your left hand will cover one fret and you can play through all the notes in the scale across those four frets. Divide the four overlapping sections.

Each one of these is still the same scale just at a different point on the fretboard.

Get it?
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Mar 9, 2009,
#10
thanks for the replies. i think i get it i just thought that whatever note you start on determines the key of the scale. so what if i wanted to play a minor pentatonic scale in the key of A# or Bb?

i know that sounds stupid just tryna get my head around some of this music theory stuff. thanks
#13
Quote by mmnohmygod
thanks for the replies. i think i get it i just thought that whatever note you start on determines the key of the scale. so what if i wanted to play a minor pentatonic scale in the key of A# or Bb?

i know that sounds stupid just tryna get my head around some of this music theory stuff. thanks



If you take the first scale pattern but starting on the sixth fret you would be playing the Bb Minor pentatonic. The second pattern would then start on the ninth fret.