#1
Recently i've been trying to learn more music theory so i started reading The Crusade Columns by Josh Urban but i'm now stuck at lesson 8.

link: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_8_key_signatures_and_the_circle_of_fifths.html


I think i understand how the circle of fifths work but there is one thing that confuses me.
If you look at the circle it says that the key of C# major has 7 sharp notes and since the scale has a total of 7 notes i'm guessing that every note in the scale should be sharp?
But if i'm not wrong the third note of the C# major scale is an F and the seventh note is a C?
So in other words: How can there even be a major scale that only has sharp notes since the seventh note is one half step lower then the root? If i play a sharp note and then play the note one half step lower i should always land on a natural note?

I hope you understand you all understand what my problem is.

Thanks!
#2
C♯, D♯, E♯, F♯, G♯, A♯, and B♯


the C# major scale. if C major has no flats or sharps, then it's only logical that C# has every sharp, right ? so you just take every note from the C major scale and make it half a step higher.

what probably confuses you is enharmony, which means there are different names for the same notes. B# is the same as C, C#is the same as Dd, etc.
Last edited by The red Strat. at Mar 9, 2009,
#3
Quote by pank
Recently i've been trying to learn more music theory so i started reading The Crusade Columns by Josh Urban but i'm now stuck at lesson 8.

link: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_8_key_signatures_and_the_circle_of_fifths.html


I think i understand how the circle of fifths work but there is one thing that confuses me.
If you look at the circle it says that the key of C# major has 7 sharp notes and since the scale has a total of 7 notes i'm guessing that every note in the scale should be sharp?
But if i'm not wrong the third note of the C# major scale is an F and the seventh note is a C?
So in other words: How can there even be a major scale that only has sharp notes since the seventh note is one half step lower then the root? If i play a sharp note and then play the note one half step lower i should always land on a natural note?

I hope you understand you all understand what my problem is.

Thanks!

I do indeed understand your confusion When it says 'all 7 are sharp' it is because when talking scales, to prevent there being (C and C#, for example) two notes of the same letter in a scale we simply stick to one letter per note and then sharpen or flatten it as desired.

Hence, in the C# major scale, F is listed as E# (enharmonically, but they're the same physical note) and C is listed as B#
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#4
Yes but what you don't understand is that a sharp has nothing to do with 'natural notes', it merely means raise a half step. If you look closer at the C# scale you will notice that the two 'natural notes' F and C actually are E and B with a sharp. Which means play a half step above the E and B, which is the F and C. So even though there are sharps they just tell you to raise it. It is a way to make the circle of fifths function.

#5
You go by the sharps, not their enharmonic equivalent. I'm not exactly sure what your question is.

But remember the pattern for finding out all major scales.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8       
 w w h w w w h
#6
Quote by DisarmGoliath
I do indeed understand your confusion When it says 'all 7 are sharp' it is because when talking scales, to prevent there being (C and C#, for example) two notes of the same letter in a scale we simply stick to one letter per note and then sharpen or flatten it as desired.

Hence, in the C# major scale, F is listed as E# (enharmonically, but they're the same physical note) and C is listed as B#


Quote by Lord Jesus
Yes but what you don't understand is that a sharp has nothing to do with 'natural notes', it merely means raise a half step. If you look closer at the C# scale you will notice that the two 'natural notes' F and C actually are E and B with a sharp. Which means play a half step above the E and B, which is the F and C. So even though there are sharps they just tell you to raise it. It is a way to make the circle of fifths function.




Oooh, now i get it I feel so stupid now
and thanks for the quick replys!
#7
Quote by pank
Oooh, now i get it I feel so stupid now
and thanks for the quick replys!

No problem, at least you understood the answer and were thankful - the guy in my sig was less grateful and has now been immortalised for his ignorance
Hey, look. Sigs are back.