#1
I have recently become aware that I'm not nearly as good with chords as I'd like to be. I was hoping the good people here on UG would help me out. Post the name of a chord (please nothing too advanced) and I will attempt to post the answer.

Note : If ten chords have been posted and I havn't answered yet, please don't post.

Thank you for all your help.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#3
Csusb9 : C G Db
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#4
Quote by The_Sophist
Csusb9 : C G Db


No. Do you want me/us to explain why you're wrong, or leave it up to you to do the research, and then come back and re-attempt? I don't want to explain why you're wrong only for you to tell me you'd have preferred doing it yourself from whatever various sources you're learning from. But no, your attempt is wrong; partly my fault though. _susb9 is a bit of a misleading name for someone not au fait with chord naming conventions.

A few more:

_7#11
_m9b5
_dim7
#5
I would like you to explain in as much detail as to why I'm wrong.

C7#11 : C E G Bb F#

Cm9b5 : C Eb Gb Bb Db

Cdim7 : C Eb G Bbb
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#6
To explain why you're wrong on the _susb9 one, I first ask you to try and name _sus (Note that does not say _sus4). But therein lies the problem with trying to ask you to name _susb9. The _sus label is used for the sake of brevity and means _7sus4. So if you can name a _7sus4 chord (or _sus), then maybe you can name a _7susb9 (_susb9) chord.

C7#11 - Correct.

Cm9b5 - You're wrong here, but only by one note, that note being Db - the correct note would be D. The 'm9' part of the label does not imply a minor 9th interval, the 'm' is referring to the quality of the third of the chord, not the note immediately after. So Cm9 means Cm7 with a major/natural 9th, the b5 speaks for itself. The chord you wrote would be notated Cm7b9b5 - note the minor 9th is explicitly notated.

Cdim7 - You're wrong here, too. And by one note again. But it bodes well that you're able to get your head around the bb7 and Bbb thing. The fifth of any diminished chord is a diminished 5th, so should be notated Gb. The chord you wrote would be called Cm6 (there's no point looking at the bb7 as being so if there is a perfect fifth, so it makes sense to call it A instead of Bbb and make it the major sixth, giving you a Cm chord with a 6; Cm6.

More:

_maj7#11
_7b9#11
_m7b13
#7
Cmaj7#11 : C E G B F#

C7b9#11 : C E G Bb Db F#

Cm7b13 : C Eb G Bb Ab
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#8
Awesome, all spot on. I hope the explanations as to your incorrect posts are adequate and you're learning from them.

Et plus:

_6/9
_7#5#11
_7sus4
_+
_m11
#9
Sixth chords give me some trouble, but I'll give it a shot.

C6/9 - C E G A with a D in the root?

C7#5#11 - C E G# Bb F#

C7sus4 - C F G Bb

C+ - C E G#

Cm11 - C Eb G Bb D F

God I bet I'm wrong.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#10
C6/9 - Correct. But the D doesn't need to be in the bass, the 6/9 has nothing to do with its inversion.

C7#5#11 - Yup.

C7sus4 - Yes. (Remember this is usually shortened to just _sus)

C+ - Correct.

Cm11 - Good.

Now try _7susb9.

Give me a shout if you want me to keep posting some names, and hopefully someone else might throw some in. Good job man.
#11
C Db G Bb?
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#12
Almost, one note's missing. And that's my fault for not giving you the whole chord name again, sorry. The full label would be _7sus4b9 (and again it's usually shortened to _7susb9 and further to _susb9), so you can probably deduce from that what note you missed out.

Feeling more confident now?
#13
No, the more I learn to more I see there is to learn. But thanks alot man. You can keep posting them if you want, but if you don't I'll just strick around the name that chord thread, don't want to be a nuisance.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#14
7#9
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#15
_7#5#9
_13sus#5
_m13(no 9th)
Last edited by Kaos_00 at Mar 10, 2009,
#16
So Csus is actually C7sus4?
I thought when you see sus on it's own it implies that it is a sus4 I've never heard anything about it being an implied dominant 7th with a sus4.
Si
#17
C7#9 : C E G Bb D#

C7#5#9 : C E G# Bb D#

C13sus#5 : C E G# Bb D F A

Cm13(omit 9) : C Eb G Bb F A
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#18
Can you do it in reverse?

Like we give notes and you name the chord?

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

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Who's Andy Timmons??
#20
Yes, you can do whatever you think will help me with chord formulas, just explain what I have to do.

Note : I have trouble with inversions, so keep those simple for now please.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#22
Name the chords and provide each note with a function. Root note is always the first note.

F - A - E - G

Ab - Cb - Ebb - Gbb

F# - A# - Cx - E#

G - C - F - A

And some more labels:

_7b9#9b5

_min/maj13

_dim9

In any key apart from C.

Last edited by Johnljones7443 at Mar 10, 2009,
#23
You got C7#5#9 and Cm13(omit 9) correct but you missed the sus chord again. Sus implies a dominant chord with a suspended 4th replacing the 3rd. No major/minor tonality. C13 is C E G Bb D F A. Sus replaces the E with an F and then raise the G(#5).

There really isn't much more to it... you were confused and corrected on the sus abbreviation a couple of times and I can't really think if any specific formula that you haven't seen in this thread yet.

mM could be good. Heh.
#24
Alright this has been bothering me because I learned things different so I did some research. The following two statements are false.
Quote by Johnljones7443
The _sus label is used for the sake of brevity and means _7sus4.
Quote by Kaos_00
Sus implies a dominant chord with a suspended 4th replacing the 3rd.


The notation "_sus" means "_sus4". The dominant 7th is not implied.

I checked a couple theory books. One didn't mention the abbreviated sus chord and wrote all the chord names out in full sus4 sus2 7sus4 etc. The other book The Guitar Handbook by Ralph Denyer says on page 131...
"Suspended Fourth Chord
Written as sus4 or abbreviated to sus
Chord spelling: 1st 4th 5th."

I also did a google search for "sus chord" and clicked every link on the first page. Some didn't mention the abbreviation at all. Four links did mention it and they all described the abbreviation "sus" as meaning "sus4" that is Csus = Csus4 = 1 4 5 = C F G (no dominant seventh implied or mentioned).

If you want your sus chord to be a dominant seventh then you would write it as such for example C7sus or C7sus4.

Here are the links to the different pages from my google search:
link 1 sus chords
link 2 sus chords
link 3 sus chords
link 3 sus chords

My search turned up no results to support the idea that " _sus" was an abbreviation for "_7sus4".
Si