#1










so ive finally got everything set up, and everything is working. however i have one problem. one 9 volt isnt enough to power the LEDs inside the guitar, and the output brightness is VERY weak. i figure im going to have to power them from the input jack, but im stuck on what level of a resistor i should use. do i decide this based on the voltage of the amp?


ALSO, for anyone who wants to know plexiglass has more of a bright side to it.
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

Last edited by koalabacon at Mar 9, 2009,
#4
Quote by Xhale1
dude...im jealous.....how did u make it???

i basically bought a plexi V, then i ran a circuit thru it putting leds behind both pickups and in the main chamber for wires n ****.
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#6
Quote by divinorum69
Hey get a bigger Voltage battery! or wire two in parallel. I dont think your gonna get enough from the input jack

i dont have enough room for two. do they make high voltage batteries the same size as nine volts?

are you sure i wont get enough power from the input jack ?
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#7
Quote by koalabacon
i dont have enough room for two. do they make high voltage batteries the same size as nine volts?

are you sure i wont get enough power from the input jack ?


Im not sure, but I think so. Because if not everyone would wire leds to the input jack, and would not add a 9 Volt battery like they do. Plus how much current do you need to transmitt electrical pulses from the pickups to the amp, im guessing that a low current.
#9
Quote by divinorum69
Im not sure, but I think so. Because if not everyone would wire leds to the input jack, and would not add a 9 Volt battery like they do. Plus how much current do you need to transmitt electrical pulses from the pickups to the amp, im guessing that a low current.


i dont know the exact current tbh. i just figured the amp would supply enough power for either.
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#10
Quote by divinorum69
Ebay


the wiring i did myself. the guitar however, im unsure of.

Quote by blandguitar
well, aren't batteries DC and the input AC? i could be wrong but is that why?


ive never heard it described like this dude.
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

Last edited by koalabacon at Mar 9, 2009,
#12
radioshack people lied to me. they said id need one. bastards.
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#13
Quote by koalabacon
i dont know the exact current tbh. i just figured the amp would supply enough power for either.


Yeah the amp has a lot of power, but for the speakers, The guitar has little power. Imagen 60 watts going through your guitar I believe that that would be dangerous

Well I put two leds on one of my guitars, so I did needed a resistor, 100 Ohms. But for two leds. Also how much is the resistance of your resistor?
Last edited by divinorum69 at Mar 9, 2009,
#14
batteries, pedals, and such run off of direct current, which basically just goes in one direction, hence the direct. AC is alternating, which kinda shifts back and forth carry it like waves on a beach, house stuff runs off of AC and batteries, video games, and clocks and stuff run off of DC, that's why most appliances need transformers, to change the voltage, and type of current.

edit: of course i could be wrong and be full of sh**, but i think im right.
#16
Quote by blandguitar
batteries, pedals, and such run off of direct current, which basically just goes in one direction, hence the direct. AC is alternating, which kinda shifts back and forth carry it like waves on a beach, house stuff runs off of AC and batteries, video games, and clocks and stuff run off of DC, that's why most appliances need transformers, to change the voltage, and type of current.

edit: of course i could be wrong and be full of sh**, but i think im right.

you sound like you know what youre talking about. ill wiki it later
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#17
Quote by blandguitar
batteries, pedals, and such run off of direct current, which basically just goes in one direction, hence the direct. AC is alternating, which kinda shifts back and forth carry it like waves on a beach, house stuff runs off of AC and batteries, video games, and clocks and stuff run off of DC, that's why most appliances need transformers, to change the voltage, and type of current.

edit: of course i could be wrong and be full of sh**, but i think im right.


You are right most of the things we use, run on DC current. But wtf does it have to do with this?
#18
i dont know if amps use transformers to turn it into Dc or if they run off ac, point is. if you use a battery to do the LEDs then you probably shouldn't use AC, just my thoughts on why it wouldn't work on the input jack. but i'd remove the resistor or change the value to give more power. or use a 12V
#19
Quote by blandguitar
i dont know if amps use transformers to turn it into Dc or if they run off ac, point is. if you use a battery to do the LEDs then you probably shouldn't use AC, just my thoughts on why it wouldn't work on the input jack. but i'd remove the resistor or change the value to give more power. or use a 12V


Imagine an amp using AC. It would be like a tremolo effect, turning on and off at very high speeds. It would blue up. AC current is used in big values, normally, almost everything uses DC, thats why everything has a transformer.
#20
12V you say. are they bigger then a standard 8V?
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#23
space is more of the concern. seeing as how its plexi glass they tried to might everything inside the guitar more tight together for appearance,
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#25
Quote by koalabacon
space is more of the concern. seeing as how its plexi glass they tried to might everything inside the guitar more tight together for appearance,


well check out radioshak, there are 12V batteries not bigger than 9V I believe, also the 30v I just gave the link too
#26
Quote by koalabacon
+1 this will be useful. thanks.


nice leprechaun guitar btw


Thanks, I hope it works with you, Search in google for led calculators, there you enter all your values, such as Voltage, amount of leds, and then you should get the resistance needed for the leds
#27
im def going to need a higher voltage. i took out the resistor and immediately i can see the difference. but im gonna want more light behind it. [more leds =more power]


ill get up pics tomorrow of what t looks like.
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#28
Quote by koalabacon
im def going to need a higher voltage. i took out the resistor and immediately i can see the difference. but im gonna want more light behind it. [more leds =more power]


ill get up pics tomorrow of what t looks like.


Do so.

So are u getting a 30v battery?
#29
no that wont be needed. the 9 volt is doing its job fine. a 12 volt at most will be sufficient.
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#31
no room for that.
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#33
There is so much fail in this thread I had to post.

To the TS: Just use lower values of resistors. What value are you using now? Also, what LEDs are you using. They make ones called "High Brightness Water Clear." These are the really bright ones.

To the AC/DC debate: An amp DOES run on AC. There is what is called the POWER TRANSFORMER. This turns the AC to DC for the circuit to use. ANYTHING THAT PLUGS IN USES AC. It may turn it to DC as the first thing in the circuit though.

Where is the "Input" Jack on a guitar? There is an "Output" jack that runs signal "Out" of a guitar into the amp. The amp does not send power up the cable to the guitar. This would shock the piss out of you, and possibly kill you.
#34
Quote by divinorum69
Imagine an amp using AC. It would be like a tremolo effect, turning on and off at very high speeds. It would blue up. AC current is used in big values, normally, almost everything uses DC, thats why everything has a transformer.


yes because all sound is AC do you really think you could hear 440 on/offs a second cos thats a middle C i think
#35
Quote by end_citizen
There is so much fail in this thread I had to post.

To the TS: Just use lower values of resistors. What value are you using now? Also, what LEDs are you using. They make ones called "High Brightness Water Clear." These are the really bright ones.

To the AC/DC debate: An amp DOES run on AC. There is what is called the POWER TRANSFORMER. This turns the AC to DC for the circuit to use. ANYTHING THAT PLUGS IN USES AC. It may turn it to DC as the first thing in the circuit though.

Where is the "Input" Jack on a guitar? There is an "Output" jack that runs signal "Out" of a guitar into the amp. The amp does not send power up the cable to the guitar. This would shock the piss out of you, and possibly kill you.


^this

You can run many LED's from a single 9v battery, there is no need for a 30v battery.
#36
Quote by end_citizen
There is so much fail in this thread I had to post.

To the TS: Just use lower values of resistors. What value are you using now? Also, what LEDs are you using. They make ones called "High Brightness Water Clear." These are the really bright ones.

To the AC/DC debate: An amp DOES run on AC. There is what is called the POWER TRANSFORMER. This turns the AC to DC for the circuit to use. ANYTHING THAT PLUGS IN USES AC. It may turn it to DC as the first thing in the circuit though.

Where is the "Input" Jack on a guitar? There is an "Output" jack that runs signal "Out" of a guitar into the amp. The amp does not send power up the cable to the guitar. This would shock the piss out of you, and possibly kill you.


OMG WTFACKZOR

You are a fail dude, We all KNOW THAT AMPS RUN ON AC!!! EVERYTHING ON YOUR ****ING HOUSE DOES! but I WAS SPECIFICALLY TALKING ABOUT INSIDE THE CIRCUIT OF THE AMP, AFTER THE TRANSFORMER. I ALSO SUGGESTED TAKING RESISTORS BEFORE YOU, THATS NO FAIL.

Quote by koalabacon
im def going to need a higher voltage. i took out the resistor and immediately i can see the difference. but im gonna want more light behind it. [more leds =more power]


ill get up pics tomorrow of what t looks like.



ALSO, I DO NOT CARE, WE ALL KNEW THAT BY SAYING INPUT OR OUTPUT JACK WE ARE REFERRING TO WHERE THE CABLE CONNECTS TO THE GUITAR. And im sure, that some power does run through the guitar, I was not sure that it would be enough to light leds.

SORRY you are the first person that ever pissed me off on UG, you really should read the whole effin thread before saying BS. Okay, I know my physics, at least the basics, im not dumb, and neither is TS. So GTFO
Last edited by divinorum69 at Mar 10, 2009,
#37
Quote by divinorum69
OMG WTFACKZOR

You are a fail dude, We all KNOW THAT AMPS RUN ON AC!!! EVERYTHING ON YOUR ****ING HOUSE DOES! but I WAS SPECIFICALLY TALKING ABOUT INSIDE THE CIRCUIT OF THE AMP, AFTER THE TRANSFORMER. I ALSO SUGGESTED TAKING RESISTORS BEFORE YOU, THATS NO FAIL.


ALSO, I DO NOT CARE, WE ALL KNEW THAT BY SAYING INPUT OR OUTPUT JACK WE ARE REFERRING TO WHERE THE CABLE CONNECTS TO THE GUITAR. And im sure, that some power does run through the guitar, I was not sure that it would be enough to light leds.

SORRY you are the first person that ever pissed me off on UG, you really should read the whole effin thread before saying BS. Okay, I know my physics, at least the basics, im not dumb, and neither is TS. So GTFO


Someone forgot their meds and to answer my questions. What value of resistors are you using? and what kind of LEDs are you using?

Also, the voltage that the pickups produce is running in the millivolts. An LED usually requires somewhere between 1.5-3.2 volts. Also how are you running the LEDs? In parrallel or series?

Don't take it personal, it's just a website full of know-it-alls
#38
Quote by end_citizen
Someone forgot their meds and to answer my questions. What value of resistors are you using? and what kind of LEDs are you using?

Also, the voltage that the pickups produce is running in the millivolts. An LED usually requires somewhere between 1.5-3.2 volts. Also how are you running the LEDs? In parrallel or series?

Don't take it personal, it's just a website full of know-it-alls


Okay, but you can just bumpin saying its full of fail, its just not right, when I put some effort trying someone to get an amazing glowing guitar. And you should read before posting. I already provided him with a link with information about the voltage that leds shoud recieve, also explained about different conditions that take places in series or parallel circuits


http://www.theledlight.com/ledcircuits.html

http://www.theledlight.com/ledcircuits.html

http://www.theledlight.com/ledcircuits.html

http://www.theledlight.com/ledcircuits.html
Last edited by divinorum69 at Mar 10, 2009,