#1
I was looking at couple Epiphone Les Pauls, and noticed some had bolted necks and some had set necks, ie., LP 100 and LP Studio. Is there a big difference between the 2? This is my first guitar, so I don't really know much about them.


Thanks!
#2
I don't think it would really matter for a beginner, because you are just starting out, but once you become more experienced, you will develop a preference between the two.
Gibson Les Paul Traditional
Crate V33 212 Combo
DigiTech Whammy IV
Dunlop Crybaby
MXR Classic Distortion
Ibanez DE-7 Delay
Boss GE-7 Equalizer

#3
Well with a bolt on neck, if the neck breaks you can replace it. However, a one peice or a set in can have a better tone.
Quote by crazy8rgood

Oh, look at those naughty waffles and their banana's...

*fapfapfapfapfap*

(if this is against the rules, I'll take it down.)
#4
yes, I suggest the set neck. Also look into ESP guitars and Ibanez and shecter. They are a better value than anything fender or gibson or epiphone.
#5
There is some difference, I know that for sure but its more subtle than something like your amp or even the strings you are using or the type of pickups you have or the type of guitar (Tele/strat/LP/etc.). I don't remember the differences though.
#6
bolt ons are easier to repair so if you arent planning on gigging with it just get a set net.
Quote by thestonedone
You see this is why it's wrong to rape your guitar... in public.

Quote by mroctoberfest
I want to name an invention the Insta-gasm 3000. I feel very strongly about this.

Gear Setup:
Jackson Rhoads
Digitech Grunge
Fender FM 212R
#7
Bolt on necks are much, much easier and cheaper to replace or repair if they're damaged. They also give better sustain and transferal of playing dynamics if it's a really well done joint.

However you only get 'really well done joints' when you start looking at guitars like the Fender American series and higher.

On a bad bolt-on join (which is basically what you get with anything that costs you less than a grand), you will lose sustain, note definition, everything.


So on low-range and mid-range guitars, go for a set neck, always.
On high-end guitars, go for a bolt-on, always.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#8
The LP100 and special are the lower priced models and are bolt necks. The studio is the same as the more popular and more expensive set neck LPs. The studio doesnt have the frills like binding, flame maple caps so its not as expensive. The set neck bolt neck is a preference thing. With LPs theres not a choice most are the traditional set neck design. The question of which is better, set or bolt, has been raging for a long time. If your gonna buy an epi try several at the store to find 1 that plays good before you buy. Epis quality control is nonexistant so there are good epis to be had and bad 1s.
#11
Quote by MrFlibble
Bolt on necks are much, much easier and cheaper to replace or repair if they're damaged. They also give better sustain and transferal of playing dynamics if it's a really well done joint.

However you only get 'really well done joints' when you start looking at guitars like the Fender American series and higher.

On a bad bolt-on join (which is basically what you get with anything that costs you less than a grand), you will lose sustain, note definition, everything.


So on low-range and mid-range guitars, go for a set neck, always.
On high-end guitars, go for a bolt-on, always.


Theres no always, its a matter of personal preference
#12
It's pretty much impossible to justify a technically inferior construction style though. When one method offers worse sustain, worse dynamic reaction, less tonal tranferral and not a single benefit... well, you've got to be pretty ****ing stupid to use it.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#13
Personally, I disbelieve that anyone here can extract any sound difference between the two, from the actual audible (as opposed to reputed) differences due to pickups, strings, hollow or solid body, and of course amp. Unless your ears are superior to a good waveform analyzer, you won't hear any alleged neck joint differences.

However, there are practical differences. Besides bolt-ons making neck replacement easier, they permit shimming as an additional way to adjust action. But in my opinion, these differences aren't nearly enough to influence a buying decision. That decision is much more sensibly based on sound, comfort, price, and build quality.
#14
^ Pretty much. Your much better off just going with overall sound as opposed to that type of bolt on neck. Its kinda like how I was with picking my acoustic. There are times that a good laminate top sounds better than a solid top in the same price range (The low range that is T_T)
#15
FWIW, if you are going to spend $300 on a guitar, an LP 100 is not the way to do it... neither is the choice between set and bolt on necks. At that stage in the game, buying a guitar is about a few things to me: A) the bridge and B) the pickup orientation. I think it's important in a first guitar to NOT have a wammy bar of any kind. The goofy Fender style wammy bars are just plain ridiculous and I can't imagine that any sort of locking trem in that price range is any better. I'd go set bridge for sure if I were you. Next is the pickup orientation. The pick ups will be sub par, but regardless if you want humbucker tone then get a guitar with a humbucker. Nothing is more frustrating to a strat-copy player like me than to try to get warmth and girth from those stupid single coil pieces of poop.

I'd recommend you do as one of the others suggested and look at an Ibanez, Shecter, ESP, or even a Dean. Schecter's Omen 6 is $300 and a really nice guitar to play, it sounds wonderful and played much better than what I am used to. As for a beginner Ibanez, I'd check out the GSA60 or the GAX70. I had friends with those when I started playing and I was always jealous of their tone and playability. I'd even take those $200 guitars over a $300 LP100. The old rhythm guitarist in my band used to rock nothing but Dean guitars, he had three and they were each less than $350, and I liked them all. Just my two cents.
Chain:
Fingers -> Schecter Damien FR -> Fulltone OCD -> ABY Box -> Bugera V22 / Peavey 6505+
#16
As a rule of thumb...if it's a gibson style guitar you will be better off with a set neck.
Fender,bolt on.
But I think what the guy above me said is a bit off.
Look for a guitar with a humbucker AND a single coil,so that you can experience both and see what you like best.
However if you can't get both,get a humbucker.
And as for bridges:
Don't go for a cheapo floyd rose,if you REALLY want a whammy bar (which you don't realy need much) go for a fender style one and use it lightly.
Seagulls,the chicken of the ocean.

Originally posted by Gunpowder:
Everyone just jumps on the bandwagon and gives the same advice in these situations. You know what? I'm going to be different. Call the firemen.
#17
It doesn't make enough difference to care about.


If you get off on the fact that your guitar has had more effort put into the creation of it then set necks are the way for you, or if the model you want only comes in set necks and you don't care what type neck joint it has.

If don't give a crap who toiled over making your instrument or for how long they did so + you want a generally cheaper guitar + if you want a guitar that can be customised that bit more/is easier to repair then bolt-on is for you, or if you dont care and the model you want has only bolt on yadayadyada...
Jackson DK2M
Washburn WD-18SW
Ibanez RGR421EXFM
Genz Benz El Diablo 100w -> Framus Dragon 412
Boss GE-7
Ibanez TS-9
#18
Regular set neck is a big turn-off for me. The big chunk of wood at the joint really blocking me from accessing the higher frets. Set-thru neck is another story, though. Very smooth and wonderful high frets access.
G͔͓̅e͎͉̟̽ͬ͐̎̃͐ͨͅå͈͖͕̹̤̟̐̏͋ͅr̩͕̫̰̗s̹̳̼ͥ̒̍̄̅ͥ̚:


ESP Standard Eclipse I CTM VW
ESP LTD Deluxe H-1001
ESP LTD Deluxe Viper-1000 STBC
ESP Edwards E-EX-100STD
Warmoth Paulcaster "Tiger"
Tanglewood TW170 AS
Vox Tonelab ST
Blackstar HT-1R


#19
I don't really care which I'm playing on. I don't need 10+ seconds of sustain from a guitar 99% of the time and the "lack" of tone I get from a bolt-on isn't noticeable; even to the people on here with such strong opinions.
#20
wow xstillspinninx, now that was just off base my friend, there are many players who prefer single coils, you may not but there is no need for degrading single coils. Anyway the difference between set and bolt on necks is simply a personal preference, there is no audible difference to human ears. However if you are bent on an Epiphone I would suggest getting the Les Paul Studio over the LP 100 for the carved body of the Studio will probably be more comfortable to play. However I would suggest you go to a music shop and playing a lot of guitars you may find you aren't a fan of the Les Paul body style or something. Keep your mind open to all the possibilities.

Good luck and stick with it
MIM Fender Telecaster
SX GG1 Junior (Les Paul Special clone)
Dillion Canada DXC 58 (DC Les Paul Junior)
Fender Joe Strummer Telecaster
Squier CV Duo Sonic
Epiphone Les Paul Junior Special
Squier Jazz Bass
Vox DA 15
Fender FM 212R
#21
As has been said repeatedly(by anyone who's not a moron coughMrFlibblecough) there are differences but i's mostly a matter of preference. I'm going to go into a bit greater detail than has already been stated though.

Bolt ons, when done well, sustain and resonate just as well, if not better than set necks. Problem is, as has been stated, bolt ons are usually used on lower end guitars which are NOT done with the most care. Next issue, of course, is upper fret access. This really comes down to what kind of player you are. If you're a shredder, you MAY want to stay away from bolt ons if you're doing a lot of work around the 22nd fret and higher. Of course there's also options like the Ibanez all access neck joint which are less bulky. If, however, you're doing a lot of rhythm work and are mainly just riffing, upper fret access isn't much of an issue. As has been mentioned repeatedly, bolt on necks are much much MUCH easier to repair and replace.

On to set necks. In general, they are considered to sustain and resonate better than bolt ons. Noticeably? Probably not. Also, what hasn't been mentioned yet is the fact that even on many mid-priced set neck guitars, you're still not going to get the best build quality on the joint. You're basically talking about 2 pieces of wood glued together. get through the finish on most mid range set necks and you're going to find a lot of wood filler and glue in the seem. Not the best for sustain or resonance. There's also a lot of evidence that, given the same high end production on each, a bolt on will actually perform better than a set neck. Again, noticeably? Probably not. Also, some set neck guitars are not going to give you any better upper fret access than their bolt on equivalents. LPs for example. It doesn't matter either way. The joint is squared with the body. Bolt on or set neck the only difference is possibly having to slide over the neck plate on the bolt on. The shape is basically the same.

As for through body construction, well, that's a whole different ball of wax all together. The consensus is pretty much that neck through is a superior build method for tone and sustain. Again, repairs are going to be a bitch compared to a bolt on. The main thing that many people forget when getting a through neck guitar is that your pups are in the neck wood. Therefore, your neck wood is giving you almost all of your wood based tone(which, by the way is still very little compared to pups, amp and technique) leaving very little input from the wings of the body. So, for example, if you like the dark Les Paul sound(traditionally mahogany body with maple neck) getting that wood combination with a neck through design is going to yield very different results and not leave you a very happy camper. It's going to be a lot brighter because you're basically going to have a tone based almost completely in maple.

Personally, my first guitar was a bolt on. I loved it. My current guitar is a set neck. I love it. The 7 string that I'm making in the next few days is, however, going to be a bolt on. I'm sure I'll love that also. From there, it's very likely that the purchase after that is going to be a through neck. It's just not a big enough issue for me one way or another to be a deal breaker. It's similar to people being dead set on a specific tone wood and then going with pups that alter it's sound to something entirely different.(active emg's and mahogany, for example)
#22
^^ F*cking hell wall of text.

Keep it simple guys this is his first guitar an you're talking about getting an ESP or Schecter or Ibanez.
Pick the guitar that you like better and the one that feels best in your hands. Who cares how its held together, bolt on or glue (set neck). At this point in time you just wanna get going, play a guitar that feels comfortable to your picking hand and especially fretting hand. All your knowledge will come, through playing, reading and so on as well as your personal likes and dislikes about what sort of guitar best suits you. You'll naturally develop your own preferences in what you're looking for in an instrument the more you play and get into it. Don't be afraid to try new gear.

As for which to get now? Like I said pick the one you like the most. Fiddle around with it even if you can't play. See if you like the feel of the neck in your hand, the weight of it, the sound etc. Don't get too caught up all of the little things. First guitars don't last long anyways, they usually get dumped in the closet after about a year and something new is bought or you find out it wasn't for you so you quit so don't think you need to spend lots of $$
2003 Music Man Axis Pacific Blue Burst
#23
In the Epi's case bolt-on necks usually means it's one of their cheaper guitars, like the Special II or a similiar guitar, but generally just because it's a bolt-on doesn't mean it's a bad guitar.
Guitars

- Epiphone Les Paul Standard Ebony Finish
- Hohner Hc-06 Classical guitar

Amplifiers

-Roland Cube 30x
Effects
- Vox Wah-wah