#1
When you're improvising or something on the guitar, how do you "remember" what notes/frets you can/can't play. Usually I do it based on my aural memory of the notes (I've got some years of experience of piano and music theory behind me), and it usually works out, but there's got to be some better way to do it. Any way, besides just remembering?
#3
yeah theory is misunderstood. Its not just memorizing scales or how to read music or how to arpeggiate. Its knowing how and when to apply that knowledge, which is the real tricky part in my oppinion
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#4
well, yes I do know theory (scales, formation of scales etc.) but when I'm improvising, I tend not to be able to remember all the notes at once.
#6
Shapes.

But don't just look at scales as being shapes, it's just a helpful way to remember where to play.
#7
Everything a human does is remembering

Skills we can do are based on memories of how to do em.

You just have to play frequently, and they will go from "Trying to remember em" to "knowing em".

There's no easier way to walk then to walk.

Just like this, over time you will know in a split sec where notes are located on the fretboard, as well as chords, etc.


It comes with time, just like learning a language.

Like you can say sentences with meanings instantly right?

Just like this over time you can choose ur notes just like you choose ur words in speaking, and you will be able to make em musical, just like you make a sentence meaningfull.

Music is just a language, and an abstract 1 at that, but its' basically the same, a sound you make to spread a message or feeling.

You just got to practice alot in order to make it smoothly.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 10, 2009,