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#1
When I play or hear certain notes, I tend to see them in my head as colors. I was wondering if anyone else out there tends to do this when remembering what to play. For example, the note A (or chord formations based around A) is a very deep blue to me. The B chord is a very stale green. And G major is a very reddish-orange, and reminds of the leaves during Fall. Seeing these notes and chords as certain colors has helped me with making chord progressions, as well as remembering long or difficult songs. Does anyone else out there do this? If not, what does music make you see?
#2
that's actually really cool dude, I'm a bit different though. I just go into a different world when I play, it's like there's nothing, and I'm not even thinking, it's just happening.
#3
i would be afraid to listen to anything jimi hendrix or pink floyd if i saw colors from music... my mind would explode.
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#5
Quote by jtfletch11
The B chord is a very stale green.


lol
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#6
Lol yeah I'm the same. Although it's more when I'm listening to songs on CD or my ipod.

e.g. Little Wing - Jimi Hendrix is sky blue
I Am The Resurrection - Stone Roses is yellow
Hey Jude - Beatles is deep red
Redemption Song - Bob Marley is green and brown
#7
I have the same, and in ym mode lesson I actually wrote a small article on the relationship between colours to music, although it's quite ambiguous.

I had the same, but I had it more with overall sound. Like Van halens sounds reminded me of purple.

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#9
Quote by RedDevil07

Redemption Song - Bob Marley is green and brown



hmmm... I wonder where that association came from?
#10
Everything by bob marley is green.
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Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


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theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#11
Quote by plbrynt
Synesthesia...?


Yep, that's what it is. There is a guy at my work that has it, and this is exactly how he describes it. He can do crazy sh*t like tell you what pitch the ceiling fan is, and tell whether his neighbors cat is hungry from the pitch/color of his meow.
#12
Quote by se012101
Yep, that's what it is. There is a guy at my work that has it, and this is exactly how he describes it. He can do crazy sh*t like tell you what pitch the ceiling fan is, and tell whether his neighbors cat is hungry from the pitch/color of his meow.



I have something similar as well.

I can transcribe almost anything, because I link sound with certain feelings. Not standard emotions, I have that as well, but this is different.

If I hear someone play a guitar or musical passage, I literally "imagine/see" the guitar neck in my head with my fingers playing the notes.


That's why I suck at pitch software, but can transcribe as good as anything (as long as I have the knowledge of how the sound is made), even pitches from alarm clocks, or police sirens.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 10, 2009,
#13
Quote by xxdarrenxx
I have something like that as well.

I can transcribe almost anything, because I link sound with certain feelings. Not standard emotions, I have that as well, but this is different.


That's why I suck at pitch software, but can transcribe almost anything (as long as I have the knowledge of how the sound is made), even pitches from alarm clocks, or police sirens.


I'm jealous. I'm pretty handy at transcribing, but we probably take radically different approaches. I even tried to take acid and play guitar, and I didn't see anything! I did play pretty well, though.
#14
Just associating sounds with colors doesn't qualify as synaesthesia. True synaesthesia is testable, unchanging, and diagnosable. Visit a doctor and ask.
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#15
Quote by Philbigtime
I'm jealous. I'm pretty handy at transcribing, but we probably take radically different approaches. I even tried to take acid and play guitar, and I didn't see anything! I did play pretty well, though.



Haha.

This is not something I only do with guitar.

I can do it with anything. If I see someone do a trick, I can slow it down (with a similar visualising technique) in my head, and analyse all the small movement.

I learn very fast because of this, and when I was younger I got bored of stuff, because I learned fast, but my friends not so fast, so I start doing drugs and alcohol, trying to make myself "dumber" so I still enjoyed the things I found simple.

When I went to a psychiatrist, I had to do these tests, and I have a very good objective analysis ability.

I call it my "Monkey see/monkey do" talent

Problem is, I have also some problems with controlling my emotions (Which was the initial reason why I went to a psychiatrist), so they sometimes conflict, but I haven't had any major issues since I was 17 with that.

Music helped alot, since it is impossible to "solve" or 100% understand music (You can know all the theory, still it doesn't make it directly appealing to people), so it's a natural drug for my head.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 10, 2009,
#17
Quote by wesselbindt
lolwut?

TS:
Snort acid and see if you "see" sound in a similar way you describe.


Who snorts acid?
#18
a lot of people have this condition.

there was a 16th century composer that saw colours when certain notes were played and always said "greener, greener" and no one had a clue what he was talking about

its pretty cool but if you write some music dont rely on the colours because not everyone sees this and it might cloud your thoughts
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#19
I know when John Mayer hears a note he sees colors as well. Its a great way to develop relative/ perfect pitch. Keep at it as it could be very useful down the line.
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#20
I have the same thing but for whole songs. For example i think the song Pinball Map by In Flames is bright green and the song Bullet Ride is black. I also think the major scale is yellow, the dorian mode is dark blue and the lydian mode is bright orange.
#21
I wish I could do this. It sounds like it would just add another aspect to playing. You know...make it more 3 dementional. It sounds really fun to do. I see music videos in my head when I listen to songs, but that's as close as I've come to matching colors and chords/notes.
#22
I looked up Synesthesia on Wiki, and I'm pretty sure I have some form of it. Is there any way one could learn to control it, or get better at using it? With me, sometimes it's really noticeable and other times I barely feel the connection. I'd like to be able to use it to my advantage...anyone have any tips or ideas?
#24
I write my songs with synesthesia. I really don't know theory at all, so when I come up with something I go by the flow of the colors and the way the patterns come together in my mind. If it doesn't look good, it inevitably will not sound good.
#25
It's just like intelligence 1 person has it high the other not.

Yes you can increase intelligence as well, and I believe any person can learn anything regardless of their intelligence at the moment.

It just takes longer to learn.

Same with this, I have it natural, but anyone who can fantasise or conjure up images in their mind can learn it.

It just takes more time.

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#26
Quote by wesselbindt
lolwut?

TS:
Snort acid and see if you "see" sound in a similar way you describe.



I was mentally older then most people of my age, so when they discovered something, I already done it like 2 years earlier, so it wasn't "exciting" for me to do, hence I used drugs to "re-experience" it again.

I have it from my dad, who had this quirks also, and wanted a child when he was 17, and got 1.

Now I have a half sister who's about 15 years older then me, who is married, divorced and has 2 children 1 being just 6 years younger then my brother.

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#27
Quote by se012101
Yep, that's what it is. There is a guy at my work that has it, and this is exactly how he describes it. He can do crazy sh*t like tell you what pitch the ceiling fan is, and tell whether his neighbors cat is hungry from the pitch/color of his meow.

I think the guy at your work is pulling your leg.
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#30
Quote by Archeo Avis
Just associating sounds with colors doesn't qualify as synaesthesia. True synaesthesia is testable, unchanging, and diagnosable. Visit a doctor and ask.


This is true. It's an actual medical condition. The friend at work I mentioned had an MRI as a child which revealed a link between his hearing and the visual processing part of his brain. It's more than just an association.

He also mentioned struggling with some of the problems that Darren mentioned - his one was feeling overwhelmed at restaurants and other public places because of all the sound/to him color input coming at him.
#31
Quote by Led man32
I know when John Mayer hears a note he sees colors as well. Its a great way to develop relative/ perfect pitch. Keep at it as it could be very useful down the line.


Funny this thread was started I was actually considering learning pitches this way. Was thinking of starting with G and assigning green to it to keep it simple and just going up and down the neck playing only G and when I hear it simultaneously think/see green in my mind.

Anyone have any experience with this?
#32
I have this thing too, it's pretty cool actually

E,B and G strings are quite yellow and they turn to red in about 12 fret, especially with the neck pickup, on the first e starts to be more and more like really electric blue purple thingy when getting closer to the 24 fret and when I bend from the 24 it's really bright electric blue..

And what lower do I go in the E A and D strings the more black the sound comes, but it isn't yet black in E, maybe in low D or C.. pretty weird stuff but I like it
#33
There is a guy named David Lucas Burge who claims to be able to teach people Perfect Pitch based on this. He says that everybody sees the "colors" differently, but that anybody can learn to see them. I don't know if he's legit or not, but I've read that he has quite an extensive instructional CD package.
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#34
Quote by lowbudgetband
There is a guy named David Lucas Burge who claims to be able to teach people Perfect Pitch based on this. He says that everybody sees the "colors" differently, but that anybody can learn to see them. I don't know if he's legit or not, but I've read that he has quite an extensive instructional CD package.


Yeah, that ad used to be in every single music-related mag a few years back. According to the testimonials in the ad, the method works great!
#35
Quote by xxdarrenxx
I have something similar as well.

I can transcribe almost anything, because I link sound with certain feelings. Not standard emotions, I have that as well, but this is different.

If I hear someone play a guitar or musical passage, I literally "imagine/see" the guitar neck in my head with my fingers playing the notes.


That's why I suck at pitch software, but can transcribe as good as anything (as long as I have the knowledge of how the sound is made), even pitches from alarm clocks, or police sirens.


Jealouz......
#37
SWIM didn't take any psychedelic drugs for month, then SWIM smoked ALOT of weed, tobaco and some other crap. SWIM then went to bed, put on his music, started tripping and had synesthesia like you wouldn't believe. SWIM could hear pain, taste the music, see the smell of his aftershave and could mix any sense SWIM wanted.

That being said, now SWIM can sort of experience synesthesia if he concentrates hard enough.

So yeah, next time you're hurt, try to hear your pain.
        ,
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[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#38
Quote by lowbudgetband
There is a guy named David Lucas Burge who claims to be able to teach people Perfect Pitch based on this. He says that everybody sees the "colors" differently, but that anybody can learn to see them. I don't know if he's legit or not, but I've read that he has quite an extensive instructional CD package.



Yes, anyone can learn it.

Even the most knowledgeable people just use up like 3% ( don't know actual numbers, but a tiny amount) of "brainspace".

The problem is time, with everything.

If you had the ability to live forever, then your mind has enough capability to learn everything in the world. This doesn't make you smart, but knowledgeable.

Smart = simply innovation. Do you invent stuff, or come up with theories that work in the framework of logic. that is intel.

Knowing everything is just knowledge. Even my mother could be as good as Vai in terms of technique, and pitch recognition etc. It would just take her about 130 years, but theoretically it's possible.

Now I don't know if this guy is legit. It could very well be, that his method is his personal method, but that doesn't mean it works for everyone.

That's why I don't write books. I can only give free advice, cause I know for certain (through experience with students and other people) it won't work for everyone. It depends on how you are, how ur brain works, and how ur brain learns.

I'm just being honest in those regards

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 11, 2009,
#39
it seems to me that everyone has at least a mild form of synesthesia, its just part of human nature to interperate something as being associated with some other completely unrelated thing such as a sound to a colour or an image to a feeling
#40
Quote by nick_kcin
it seems to me that everyone has at least a mild form of synesthesia, its just part of human nature to interperate something as being associated with some other completely unrelated thing such as a sound to a colour or an image to a feeling



IT is.

Because we humans can "fantasise", it the reason why we are technological advanced.

We posses this human ingenuity, that gives us the ability, to link scientific rules together to enrich our lives.

Useless though.

We create MTV, but scientifically it's just light.

We created music, but scientifically it's just sound waves tuned to a pitch that enrich our human excitement.

We create time, so we can organise our "useless" excitements, but it's just measured by light, and if we would live for a 1000 years or if it took the earth 72 hours to make 1 revolution instead of 24, then a day would feel different, then how we interpret a day now.

They don't really exist, but just in our minds, but they are just natural phenomenon linked with our fantasy to create something we emotionally respond too.

Humans don't really create stuff, in the extreme word of creation (we didn't create light, rather we modified it using our "fantasy").

A dog watching the news on tv, doesn't interpret it as "the news", but just as light, because he doesn't have this human "fantasy/interpretation ability".

I don't know if fantasy is the right word, but try to get my point.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 11, 2009,
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