#1
can all microwaves be absorbed by water to heat it or do the magnetron in microwave oven produce microwaves at wavelengths that specifically can be absorbed by water?
#4
Quote by richymisiak
can all microwaves be absorbed by water to heat it or do the magnetron in microwave oven produce microwaves at wavelengths that specifically can be absorbed by water?



How on earth are you going to absorb a microwave with water...? They're like several pounds heavy.
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Last edited by Kensai at Mar 10, 2009,
#5
Only a specific wavelength matches the resonance frequency of water molecules.

Edit: Whaddya know, Wikipedia says I'm wrong. A whole range works ...
Last edited by Malakian88 at Mar 10, 2009,
#6
Unless it's guitarshaped, I have no clue.
*stupid 09'er*

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#7
Quote by Malakian88
Only a specific wavelength matches the resonance frequency of water molecules.


ah so its due to resonant frequencies? I didn't think of that
cheers

Quote by Kensai
How on earth are you going to absorb a microwave with water...? They're like several pounds heavy.

several pounds heavy, but how make babby?
Last edited by richymisiak at Mar 10, 2009,
#8
the microwaves produced by a magnetron in a microwave oven excite polarized molecules, including water, within food. If a teacher or anyone else tells you that they are "tuned to the frequency of water" they are spouting bull****.
Quote by iceman95
ok
here's what you do
1. Take a fork, preferably metal.
2. Put some tomato sauce on it.
3. Let tomato sauce on fork dry.
4. Turn it in and call it: "The Spaghetti Massacre."


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#9
Quote by richymisiak
ah so its due to resonant frequencies? I didn't think of that
cheers

No, I was wrong.

Microwave heating is sometimes explained as a resonance of water molecules, but this is incorrect: such resonance only occurs in water vapor at much higher frequencies, at about 20 GHz.
#11
Quote by Malakian88
No, I was wrong.

Microwave heating is sometimes explained as a resonance of water molecules, but this is incorrect: such resonance only occurs in water vapour at much higher frequencies, at about 20 GHz.


ah so its all microwaves
It wasn't homework I was just wondering hehe
cheers everyone (except kensai )
#12
Geeez...all this microwave talk is making me hungry.
*stupid 09'er*

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#13
Water molecules are polar, meaning they have a positive and a negative side. Microwaves send out fast, short waves (duh). To which the water molecules are attracted, you could say the top part of the wave is positive and would therefore attract the the negative side of the water molecule, the bottom part of the wave attracts the positive side. This causes the water molecules to quickly flip up and down, this generates heat and warms up your food .
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#14
Quote by xl999
Unless it's guitarshaped, I have no clue.


+1
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