#1
hey guys,


so i need to learn some scales and my teacher gave me stuff like, dorian mode is b3, 6, and b7. but what i don't know is how to apply this to a certain key. let's say i want the G dorian mode, to apply this b3, 6, b7 stuff, which scale do i take to start with, the G major, minor, just the G, A, B,C,D, E, F,G without any flats or sharps or what ?


thanks
#2
A mode IS a scale. If you play in G Dorian, your scale will be G Dorian, not G major or G Minor. Modes are a tricky one, but if you want to put it into application, there are a few ways... for example, you could have a bassline alternating between G and it's fifth, D. Over that, you could make a melody using only the notes in the G Dorian scale, and thus you will be applying it
lolburger
#3
umm well scales and modes have a purpose... umm you have 2 know whats going on behind your part.. like the rythym guitar chords... the notes the bass is using ect... then you can determine what scale 2 use
#4
G dorian, (if I'm right, I'm assuming D dorian as d scale no sharps and flats) Is : G,A,Bb,C,D,E,F.
#5
no no no, i mean, dorian is a flat third, and flat seventh, right ?
so which scale do i take to make the third and seventh flat ?
do i take G major and flat the third and seventh, do i take G minor,...
#8
you would take a G major scale and alter it so it's Dorian. So like you said, flattening the 3rd and the 7th
#9
Dorian is a b3 6 b7 compared to the major scale
e.g.
Major = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Dorian = 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7

or you could look at it as a b3 6 b7 in relation to the minor scale
e.g.
minor = 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 (note it already has a b3 and b7 so the difference is the 6)
Dorian = 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7

So to get G dorian you could start with
G minor = G A Bb C D Eb F and raise the 6th to get
G Dorian = G A Bb C D E F

or you could start with
G Major = G A B C D E F# and lower the 3rd and 7th to get
G Dorian = G A Bb C D E F

Get it??

Dorian is most often referred to as a minor scale with a natural 6 (or major 6). This is the "modal note" when referring to Dorian. This is because it has a Root minor third and perfect fifth which makes up a minor triad so is considered a minor scale. So it is often grouped with the Phrygian mode and Aeolian (natural minor scale) as the "minor modes" and is distinguished, as I said, by the major 6th.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Mar 10, 2009,
#10
Quote by UNIe
If you play G Dorian, you're either in F major or in D Minor. Depends on the context and chords, but it's all the same scale.


Yeah, so basically you take the second note of either the F major or D Minor scale, and continue as you would for whichever scale it may be and add the D after the octave F or D.

That being said, all sharps/flats in the original F major or D Minor scale still apply, they just are just moved up a degree, if that makes sense.
I was an Internet Witness in the mike.h Murder Case.
Quote by Pauldapro
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#11
Quote by 20Tigers
Dorian is a b3 6 b7 compared to the major scale
e.g.
Major = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Dorian = 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7

or you could look at it as a b3 6 b7 in relation to the minor scale
e.g.
minor = 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 (note it already has a b3 and b7 so the difference is the 6)
Dorian = 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7

So to get G dorian you could start with
G minor = G A Bb C D Eb F and raise the 6th to get
G Dorian = G A Bb C D E F

or you could start with
G Major = G A B C D E F# and lower the 3rd and 7th to get
G Dorian = G A Bb C D E F

Get it??

Dorian is most often referred to as a minor scale with a natural 6 (or major 6). This is the "modal note" when referring to Dorian. This is because it has a Root minor third and perfect fifth which makes up a minor triad so is considered a minor scale. So it is often grouped with the Phrygian mode and Aeolian (natural minor scale) as the "minor modes" and is distinguished, as I said, by the major 6th.

aaah, i get it.
so eveytime when there's something like b3 and stuff, that's compared to the major scale of the root note ?
#12
Yes. Major Scale is 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Everything else is notated in relation to that.
Si
#13
Why do we even have a mode sticky? Can we start banning people who don't read it?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
^If you don't like it don't click it. Question is answered. TS has been helped and now understands scale notation better. That was where the problem really was - Not so much with modes but with understanding scale notation.

Can we start banning people for being an ass?
Si
#15
Quote by Archeo Avis
Why do we even have a mode sticky? Can we start banning people who don't read it?

i actually read it but i didn't get it. i do now because of this thread


thanks a lot everyone !
Last edited by The red Strat. at Mar 10, 2009,