#1
An idea came to me today which im sure has been done countless times before by other people, but I thought I'd ask anyway, just to see what people think.

If in a band the bassist has a 5 string bass, and the guitarists are only using 6 strings, the 5th string is much harder to use. If the guitars are playing an A power chord on the E string 5th fret position, could a bassist play a D on the 3rd fret of the B string? It seems to add up to 5ths to me, but im not sure if it would sound messy or confusing.

If any bands do this I'd like to know to see what sound it gets, and/or if anybody with a 5 string bass has actually tested it.
#2
Ummmm try it would be a start...... Its your music you decide whether you like it or not.
I am me. Live with it.
#4
A 5th inverted to below the root note is a 4th down from the root note.
In the key of A the 5th above is E, a 4th below is E.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#5
In your example, the bass would play the root note A...playing the 5th would muddy things up a bit.
#6
If the guitars are playing an A power chord on the E string 5th fret position, could a bassist play a D on the 3rd fret of the B string?


Introducing the 4th in the bass, into an A power chord is not a good idea.
Your note of choice would be A.
#8
Playing bass, your part is there to help support the song. Whether it be through doubling guitar riffs, locking in with the drums, or playing a melody along with the band. Your choice of notes should reflect the motions of the parts of the songs. Some notes sound better than others, but using different intervals can create a more unique texture for that part. And using different bass notes under a single guitar chord or riff can add lots of movement. METAL EXAMPLE: Megadeth - Ashes in Your Mouth. The pre-chorus part ("Where do we go from here. And shall we meet again.") The guitar plays the same riff, which is in E. The bass plays a descending riff below it going from E - D - C - E. For those 2 middle riffs the bass stands out a lot more, giving it more movement and power under the guitar lick. I believe this is called Ostinato, when a single part is played over/under a shifting key.
Also, playing 5 string. If that part calls for a super low note but the D just doesn't fit, you could your B string down to A, and maybe that will be the note your looking for. If your tone isn't really bloaty when you play chords, you then have 1 finger 5th chords on your low strings, which can be brutal is used wisely.
Last edited by istealchili at Mar 11, 2009,