#1
Why is back pain such a big thing for benefit fraudsters? Why is it always back pain that they fake so that they don't have to work? Is it easy to get a Dr to sign off on this to entitle them to benefits or something, because I know claiming disability benefit isn't that easy to defraud any more (I did a weeks work experience at the local benefit office and had a fun time with the fraud investigators for a few days)

I see a couple of blatant chav'ed up fakers when I take my daily walk who put on the worst limps and use walking sticks, the pair that I see (at seperate points of my journey) both keep switching the side that they limp on (The fakers always have chavy tracksuits on aswell by the way)

Also one of them managed to run about 15 feet with the fake limp still going while waving his stick in the air.
Opie and Anthony Fan
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#2
The government are pushing a "it's not what you can't do, but what you can" policy for benefit, hopefully reducing the number of people who can claim incapacity or disability for minor afflictions, aka the easily fakable afflictions.
#3
It's because the cause of genuine back pain can be extremely difficult to diagnose. There are no scans that are 100%(or even 80 or 90%) guaranteed to detect the cause. This makes it difficult to treat properly.
#4
Quote by MightyAl
It's because genuine back pain can be extremely difficult to diagnose. There are no scans that are 100%(or even 80 or 90%) guaranteed to detect the cause.

So even when a doctor can't give the pain a cause or source, they still sign off on it?

I understand they aren't trained to spot fraud like the investigators I watched, but surely they can't just give people benefit passes all willy nilly. I often encounter back and shoulder pain, but it's due to bad posture in certain chairs, so if I go in and don't mention that I know it's posture and hide it I could get a free pass?

Too bad I actually like working, huh
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Last edited by Liam. at Mar 11, 2009,
#5
"Ow, my back hurts" is a lot harder to prove than "Ow, my leg is broken."
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#6
dude i bet tehy are in pain, you dont realise how brutal back pain is until you have it

im 18 and have had back pain since 15, while not serious... yet?... its annoyign as hell especially when yu get a shot of pain that spikes right down into your legs and up your neck

i got it from playing hockey and rugby, although i still play them it sucks when my back is sore as fu<k
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#8
Quote by JimmyBanks6
dude i bet tehy are in pain, you dont realise how brutal back pain is until you have it

im 18 and have had back pain since 15, while not serious... yet?... its annoyign as hell especially when yu get a shot of pain that spikes right down into your legs and up your neck

i got it from playing hockey and rugby, although i still play them it sucks when my back is sore as fu<k

I do understand though, my dad has a degenerative spine disease and spinal stenosis and has legitimate pain.

I'm talking about people who fake it and don't even hide it well just to sponge off the tax payer and not work, whether you like it or not it's always the excuse the lower-class wasters use.
Opie and Anthony Fan
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#9
Quote by snipelfritz
"Ow, my back hurts" is a lot harder to disprove than "Ow, my leg is broken."

sorted
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#10
Quote by Liam.
So even when a doctor can't give the pain a cause or source, they still sign off on it?

I understand they aren't trained to spot fraud like the investigators I watched, but surely they can't just give people benefit passes all willy nilly. I often encounter back and shoulder pain, but it's due to bad posture in certain chairs, so if I go in and don't mention that I know it's posture and hide it I could get a free pass?

Too bad I actually like working, huh

They don't 'simply sign them off'. Unless they're a rubbish doctor.
My dad trained as a GP almost 30 years ago, and switched to occupational medicine about 25 years ago. He thinks that most back pain will resolve itself, and in general the best thing to do(in the absence of a specific diagnosis) is to maintain moderate activity, using heat pads ease the pain and keep the back mobile. That's certainly what he does when his back goes out(as it seems to once or twice a year these days).
#11
Quote by MightyAl
They don't 'simply sign them off'. Unless they're a rubbish doctor.
My dad trained as a GP almost 30 years ago, and switched to occupational medicine about 25 years ago. He thinks that most back pain will resolve itself, and in general the best thing to do(in the absence of a specific diagnosis) is to maintain moderate activity, using heat pads ease the pain and keep the back mobile. That's certainly what he does when his back goes out(as it seems to once or twice a year these days).


unless your like my dad who has a disk problem, which will never go away, and he has lost all feeling in his lower left leg, and when his back is aching can barely walk

all he can do is take pain killers which pretty much make him useless at living, so he has to suck it up
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jimmybanks youre a genius


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#12
Quote by JimmyBanks6
unless your like my dad who has a disk problem, which will never go away, and he has lost all feeling in his lower left leg, and when his back is aching can barely walk

all he can do is take pain killers which pretty much make him useless at living, so he has to suck it up

That's why I said most back pain. I should perhaps have said that, in cases where the cause is not apparent after investigation, that is very often an effective treatment. It doesn't(and indeed cannot) apply to all cases. Medicine is as much art as science, in that there are few absolutes.

This is the source of the doctor's problems with faked back pain - the genuine cases can pretty well destroy people's lives, so they have to take each case seriously. What makes it worse, is that there are distinct limits to what doctors can do, and in many(but not all) cases of back pain, common sense and non-medicinal treatments can often be the most effective treatment.
Again, this does not apply to all cases.