#1
Okay, this is going to sound very dumb, but I don't care, I don't know enough theory to justify NOT asking.

If I've got a verse with the chord structure of: Am, C, Em, G

What scale could/should I use to play lead over it?

Same question for: B-M7, D-M7, C#-m7

Also, why? I really would like to understand the why with the what. Thanks for any help.
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#2
On the first one, you start with A minor. The scale you use will usually be based on the first chord. So you're going to be in the key of A. But which scale?
All the chords all fit the A minor scale, so use A minor in the lead.
(Keep in mind that it's not always that strict or that simple)

As for the second one, I can't really figure it out...

Oh and don't feel dumb, it's better to ask the question.
Last edited by sickman411 at Mar 12, 2009,
#3
Thank you. Um, the second set of chords is actually the chorus to the song, and I'd like to know what I could play over that progression too. I know, it looks funky and out of key, but it actually sounds really nice together.

Again, thank you.
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I love metal but death metal's just a bit too much for me. The most I can get into is serious-illness metal.
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schmidty,
I care
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If I had an axe that could make well formed vaginas I would go out a lot less.
#4
The chords in there look kind of weird combined. I can't get the feel of the song because I can't play guitar right now, my brother's asleep and I'll wake him up... so I think I won't be able to give you an answer. Sorry. Experiment...
#5
Well, if it helps, I play the chord structure 4 times, the last time the C#-m7 is replaced by a E-M7. I don't know if that matters or what not, but I do know it resolves nicely.

Anyways, thanks for your help. Hopefully someone else will know, but I'll go dick around with my guitar for a while.
Quote by fatgraymatt
I love metal but death metal's just a bit too much for me. The most I can get into is serious-illness metal.
Quote by birdman267
schmidty,
I care
Quote by GuyWhoDoesStuff
If I had an axe that could make well formed vaginas I would go out a lot less.
#6
You're playing in A. And you're using chords from the major and minor scale. You can use Aminor over the first set of chords and Amajor over the second set.

Over the second set, avoid playing F# over the Dm7 chord....

Edit: If that's a Bmaj7 and a Dmaj7 then I'm wrong. Ignore that.

And I would start with the Bmaj/lydian scale for the chorus then move up to the Amajor scale. I think that works. Experiment with those scales over the progression. The verse is still Aminor btw.
Last edited by Kaos_00 at Mar 12, 2009,
#8
The first chord in a progression doesn't mean that's the key. What you want to do is break apart the chords and find each individual note then match those notes to a scale. If you don't know how to do that, search chord construction.
Last edited by Ssargentslayer at Mar 13, 2009,
#9
Am scale is the same as the Cmajor. They're the same pattern.

Same thing goes for Em and G. Use the same scale on these.

Like the guy above said, you could use the Am or Em over the whole thing because all those chords fit those notes. But that's lame....it sounds cooler when you change scales with the chords instead of staying with the "root" chord.

Depends on what kind of sound you want. You want a creepier sound, you want to use a diminished scale or phrygian...or minor melodic....it really doesn't matter.

A minor scale is just a major scale played over a minor chord...and vice versa. Over those minor 7th's....all those chords are is the minor chords played with the 7th note of the scale in it somewhere....so you can just use the regular minors for those. Or any minor scale with a minor 7th...not a major 7th (1 note difference).
#10
Quote by saint_berzerker
Am scale is the same as the Cmajor. They're the same pattern.

Same thing goes for Em and G. Use the same scale on these.

Like the guy above said, you could use the Am or Em over the whole thing because all those chords fit those notes. But that's lame....it sounds cooler when you change scales with the chords instead of staying with the "root" chord.

Depends on what kind of sound you want. You want a creepier sound, you want to use a diminished scale or phrygian...or minor melodic....it really doesn't matter.

A minor scale is just a major scale played over a minor chord...and vice versa. Over those minor 7th's....all those chords are is the minor chords played with the 7th note of the scale in it somewhere....so you can just use the regular minors for those. Or any minor scale with a minor 7th...not a major 7th (1 note difference).

I think he should stick to the basics first. Don't confuse him.
Last edited by Ssargentslayer at Mar 13, 2009,