#1
giving it a new set of strings, aligning the floyd rose PERFECTLY, tightening everything that needs to be tightened, and tuning it over and over for hours.

i'm sick of it.
someone told me i should throw another spring on it?
is there something else i'm missing.
#2
that new strings stretch so alligning the floyd would do jack **** if you put on new strings beforehand
#3
- What type of bridge is it exactly (Original Floyd, licensed Floyd, Ibanez Edge, etc)?
- What strings are you using (especially what gauge) and what tuning do you want them in?
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
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#4
Had the same problem when I first picked up my guitar.

It would be nice to know what kind of guitar you have, and what kind of bridge it is. Also, did you stretch your strings? New strings have a tendency to go out of tune if you don't give them a good bend before hand.
#5
Quote by MrFlibble
- What type of bridge is it exactly (Original Floyd, licensed Floyd, Ibanez Edge, etc)?
- What strings are you using (especially what gauge) and what tuning do you want them in?

The guitar is an Ibanez rg1570 with an edge pro.
the strings are ernie ball custom slinky and standard tuning.
I have a 7 string I use and play more but i really really want this guitar fixed because sometimes it's nicer to play a 6 after playing a 7 for so long.
#6
The guitar is an Ibanez rg1570 with an edge pro.
the strings are ernie ball custom slinky and standard tuning.
#7
I've found there is only one way to deal with guitars with a Rose:
Smash them against the nearest brick surface and buy any other guitar to replace it.
#8
I've had a lot of problems with Ibanez trems and tuning issues. For the longest time I wrote it off as a crappy trem but I narrowed down the issue to one problem most of the time. For some reason Ibanez doesn't tighten the neck screws down enough. Try moving the neck with your hand and see if you can't make the pitch jump a few cents with a chromatic tuner. Keep in mind that it is normal for the pitch to move a little bit due to the neck moving

If it does, then there is your culprit. Sometimes you can't tighten the neck screws down enough to fix this but I found that beer cans make the perfect shim. They are a few thousandths thinner than a coke can and almost always make the perfect neck shim
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[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
#10
Quote by Flux'D
I've had a lot of problems with Ibanez trems and tuning issues. For the longest time I wrote it off as a crappy trem but I narrowed down the issue to one problem most of the time. For some reason Ibanez doesn't tighten the neck screws down enough. Try moving the neck with your hand and see if you can't make the pitch jump a few cents with a chromatic tuner. Keep in mind that it is normal for the pitch to move a little bit due to the neck moving

If it does, then there is your culprit. Sometimes you can't tighten the neck screws down enough to fix this but I found that beer cans make the perfect shim. They are a few thousandths thinner than a coke can and almost always make the perfect neck shim

Its not just Ibanez. All guitars should have everything tightened at least once a year because the wood moves as temperatures change etc. You have to keep everything tight otherwise things will move as the wood shrinks/expands, causing it to not stay in tune.
#11
Quote by littlephil
Its not just Ibanez. All guitars should have everything tightened at least once a year because the wood moves as temperatures change etc. You have to keep everything tight otherwise things will move as the wood shrinks/expands, causing it to not stay in tune.



I used to work in a local guitar repair shop and most of the detuning Floyds I came across was due to Ibanez and their necks. Actually I can't recall of any other brand where this was a large issue haha. Not to dis on the Ibanez fanboys but this was a reoccuring problem across the whole Ibanez line. Most of the time a beer can shim fixed the problem.


As far as the the tightening everything once a year... meh it's a myth
Here's a good way to explain it... You don't have to tighen down anything on your car's engine to due vibration and temperature expansion. Unless something is loose to begin with, it's static friction point keeps it from rotating. It takes quite a bit of force to overcome this static friction (Think about how you need a screw driver to turn most screws on a guitar.) The vibration from your guitar isn't anywhere near the force it requires for you to turn said screw.
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
Last edited by Flux'D at Mar 13, 2009,
#12
Quote by Flux'D
As far as the the tightening everything once a year... meh it's a myth
Here's a good way to explain it... You don't have to tighen down anything on your car's engine to due vibration and temperature expansion. Unless something is loose to begin with, it's static friction point keeps it from rotating. It takes quite a bit of force to overcome this static friction (Think about how you need a screw driver to turn most screws on a guitar.) The vibration from your guitar isn't anywhere near the force it requires for you to turn said screw.

Thats a crap way to explain it really. Wood =/= metal. Metal doesnt shift the way wood does due to temperature, humidity, atmosphere etc. It expands and contracts in heat, but its nothing like wood. Wood moves naturally, expanding or contracting all the time, not just with temperature.

EDIT: As for not having them tightened in the first place, its safer to ship a guitar without everything tightened up.
Last edited by littlephil at Mar 13, 2009,
#13
Quote by littlephil
Thats a crap way to explain it really. Wood =/= metal. Metal doesnt shift the way wood does due to temperature, humidity, atmosphere etc. It expands and contracts in heat, but its nothing like wood. Wood moves naturally, expanding or contracting all the time, not just with temperature.

EDIT: As for not having them tightened in the first place, its safer to ship a guitar without everything tightened up.



As long as wood isn't soaking in a tub of water, it expands just as much as metal. I wasn't saying that wood = metal it was a good example of how materials expand and they don't need to be tightened down.

All materials expand to due engergy so I don't understand by what you mean with 'naturally.' The metal in the car engine is experience extreme shifts of temperature in a short period of time. It can go from the temperature of the air outside to well over a few hundred degrees (either scale, I'm not sure what temp exactly but the point is understood.)

Humidity doesn't affect metal like wood in terms of expansion but solidbody electrics don't expand much either. If anything humidity would affect how soft the wood is and how well it can hold screws. On the other hand you could argue that wood expands when humidified and the pockets would become smaller resulting in a better hold.

Atmosphere (as in pressure, or the air it's in) wouldn't affect the expansion of a material significantly. Unless you're talking on the moon or something like that.


With temperature, the finish on a guitar expands and contracts much faster than the wood which results in cracks and deformities in the instrument. Dried wood really does not up expand all that much, at least not to the point where things would become significantly loose. Acoustic guitars are much thinner and were steamed to bend the sides in the shape they are. These are affected by the mention elements but is a different arugment than the discussion of a Floyd equipped guitar.


Anyways the point is that there really is no need to go around tighening down every thing that has a phillips head on it once a year. You could end up stripping out a pocket which could be bad depending on what the screw was holding in place
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
#14
Quote by Flux'D
As long as wood isn't soaking in a tub of water, it expands just as much as metal. I wasn't saying that wood = metal it was a good example of how materials expand and they don't need to be tightened down.

Wood doesnt expand just as much as metal. They're 2 completely different things. Woods are porous, and woods are far less dense than metals. They're also weaker. Wherever there is wood on metal contact on a guitar, the wood will shrink, causing parts (ie the locking nut) to become loose, so you need to tighten it. You shouldn't tighten it enough to damage the screws, but they can be made of softer metals, so they can strip easily.
#16
This...
Quote by satcre3
...new strings stretch...

With the nut unlocked, get all of the slack out of the strings, then set it up.

Also, make sure the string retainer is low enough so that when you lock down the nut, the strings maintain their pitch (For the most part at least).
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