#1
How do you go about training your ears to hear intervals? I'd really like to learn so that I can play what I hear in my head rather than just going through finger patterns until I find something that sounds cool.
Gear List:
B.C. Rich NT Jr. V (With Seymour Duncan AHB-1 Blackout in bridge)
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
Marshall MG15DFX
Jazz III picks
DR strings
Planet Waves Cables
#2
Grab your keyboard play the root add an interval guess the interval (best if someone else did this for you)

u start to hear patterns

Your octaves are very distinguishable as their is not harmonic conflict
Your seconds sound quiet dissonance when played together

Its up to you to figure the rest but get a feel of what the interval sound like
#3
Start small, practice big.

Listen to a few intervals at a time and, when you got that down, increase the list of intervals.

There's:

www.trainear.com
http://www.musictheory.net/index.html (under the "trainers" drop down menu)
www.good-ear.com

And even your own guitar! Learn how to play intervals using your guitar.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
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#4
Quote by Martindecorum
Grab your keyboard play the root add an interval guess the interval (best if someone else did this for you)

u start to hear patterns

Your octaves are very distinguishable as their is not harmonic conflict
Your seconds sound quiet dissonance when played together

Its up to you to figure the rest but get a feel of what the interval sound like


lik he said, you should get someone to play you intervals. you'll learn them after a while
Quote by metacarpi
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#5
Transcribing helps.

Just transcribe alot, and over time you will need less "passing notes" to get to the interval.

This helps amazingly well.

An example.

If a C note is played and goes to an A note. (you don't know that the notes are C and A, because you have to transcribe it, but we assume that these will be the actual notes)

You pick ur guitar, find the C, and then try to go to the 2nd note you hear (Which is the A, but you don't know this yet). IF it's wrong, think/guess how far ur off from the note.

For example, do you think the note is 4 steps higher then go 4 steps higher. Do you think u went 2 steps to far then go back 2 steps, until you hit the correct note.

Over time, your mind/ear will remember the sounds, and you will need less "wrong "passing" notes" to hear how many steps you need to go.

It will take time though, and you need to transcribe as if it's homework to get the fastest results, but it may take weeks or months, depending on how fast you learn/pick it up.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 13, 2009,
#8
Transcription and singing are very effective and and very fun (well I enjoy them).

(by singing I mean serious work, sight singing / solfege practice and specific interval drills)
Last edited by Nick_ at Mar 13, 2009,
#10
good-ear.com is something that really helped me. also singing intevals helps as you play them on your guitar. ear training is something that can get frusterating because sometimes its hard to tell if you're making progress. keep working at it though, the results are worth it
#11
Here's some tricks for the basic ones I used.

Unison is simple enough, Major 2nd sounds like the intro to "Can't Stop" by RHCP, Major Third sounds like the first two notes of Kumbaya, Major Fourth sounds like the first two notes of Amazing Grace, or that generic wedding song, Perfect Fifth sounds like Star Wars, Major Sixth sounds like the My Bonnie song, Perfect Octave sounds like Somewhere over the Rainbow. For Major Seventh I just kept playing it to myself and got used to recognizing it. To me it always sounds like it needs another note to "finish" it. I'd play the Major Seventh interval, then play the note above it to complete the Perfect Octave, to "finish it".
#12
I have a question about this using songs to hear them method. If you practise this, will you have to think of songs everytime you want to know the interval or will you eventually just develop the normal way?
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#13
Quote by The_Sophist
I have a question about this using songs to hear them method. If you practise this, will you have to think of songs everytime you want to know the interval or will you eventually just develop the normal way?

Quoted from trainear.com:

Is associating a song bad thing in the long run?

Absolutely not. Even when you've mastered intervals it's impossible to avoid having a song, or many songs, come to mind that are related to the chord or interval being heard. This does not damage your ability for identification at all. Associating a song especially helps when you need to sing or recreate the sound in your head. It does not mean that every time you hear an interval you have to cross reference the song in your head. You will instantly start thinking the interval name without the song eventually. Associating a song gives you a reference with which you can check your answer when you're uncertain.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
It's like you read my mind!

I got meself a self-approving sig. Kick. Ass.
#14
Thanks.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#15
first you pick up your bc rich then you and barrage the people with less metal in them than two of your fingers with squealies until their ****ing heads explode