#1
Capo 2nd Fret -

Relative to Capo
Em (244222), CM (x54232), GM (542252), DM (xx2454)

F#/Gb - C#/Db - F#/Gb - A - C#/Db - F#/Gb (Em notes)

D - F#/Gb - A - D - F#/Gb (CM notes)

A - C#/Db - E - A - E - F#/Gb (GM notes)

E - B - E - G#/Ab (DM notes)

A - B - C# - D - E - F# - G# (notes)

Progression:
Em, CM, GM, DM OR iv - III - VII - IV?


So that would make this chord progression in the key of A major? ( I used the Circle of Fifths to help with that. I know the A Major Scale has F#, G#, C#..

Or am I missing something vitally important here? Like the lack of any A chord... so would it be the A Major's relative minor scale? (which I can't seem to remember off the top of my head.... anyone want to help with that as well ?)


Just like I tested my chord construction, now I'm trying to test my chord progressions, fitting chords into scales...... and god chord theory is more confusing then anything I've learned so far


EDIT:


Major Scale: C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C 
Minor Scale: A - B - C - D - E - F - G - A  
^Relative


So is the Relative Minor Scale always the Minor 6th? (or did I mess up my counting in intervals again ) of the Major scale?

Or is it the 6th note in the major scale?
eg;
C D E F G [A] B C
1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 8 




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Last edited by Invokke_Havokk at Mar 13, 2009,
#2
Minor 6th I do believe. Amaj would sound good in a progression of the A major scale... but it will sound a bit off in the Am scale of course.

Edit: I think you edited before i finished my post .
#3
Yah, I edited a bit Please look it over again.

Also if I go

Root - E
Minor 2nd - F
Major 2nd - F#
Minor 3rd - G
Major 3rd - G#
Perfect 4th - A
Augmented 4th/Diminished 5th (Tritone) - A#
Perfect 5th - B
Minor 6th - C
Major 6th - C#
Minor 7th - D
Major 7th - D#
Octave E

I land on... Minor 6th =p woops... I did make a mistake (by 2 whole intervals, edited in Major 6th, and was still off by one... hehe.. I think I forgot Tritone when counting)


Also for this progression, I don't have the AM chord. Should I add it in to make it resolve better? (I'll play it a few times with starting/ending on AM... but I really like how my current progressions sounds... I just want to get more into the theory of how/why... lol)


Also, did I do my roman numerals correctly?




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Last edited by Invokke_Havokk at Mar 13, 2009,
#4
NOT minor sixth. A to C is a minor third but C to A is a MAJOR sixth. Inversions

The root of the relative minor is a major sixth above the major scale root. (Or a minor third below).
Si
#5
Quote by 20Tigers
NOT minor sixth. A to C is a minor third but C to A is a MAJOR sixth. Inversions

The root of the relative minor is a major sixth above the major scale root. (Or a minor third below).


I just want to be able to find the Relative Minor of a Major scale as of right now. You already lost me with this post a bit. I'll work on going backwards (and maybe even sideways!) later on.

Intervals ^^; still getting used to them....


(Please note (lack of sig space): I joke around. A lot. Please practice taking my bad attempts at being funny with a light heart. (eg; and maybe even sideways!))

^ That's for all of those super-over-serious people out there..... :/




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#6
You're all over the place mate...

Quote by Invokke_Havokk
Capo 2nd Fret -

Relative to Capo
Em (244222), CM (x54232), GM (542252), DM (xx2454)

F#/Gb - C#/Db - F#/Gb - A - C#/Db - F#/Gb (Em notes)

D - F#/Gb - A - D - F#/Gb (CM notes)

A - C#/Db - E - A - E - F#/Gb (GM notes)

E - B - E - G#/Ab (DM notes)

A - B - C# - D - E - F# - G# (notes)

Progression:
Em, CM, GM, DM OR iv - III - VII - IV?


Chord notes are correct
First chord = F# A C# = F#m
Second Chord = D F# A = D
Third chord = A C# E = A
Fourth chord = E G# B = E

Notes = A B C# D E F# G# = A major (You were right on here) or relative minor F#m.

That would make this progression either in F#m as F#m D A E = i bVI bIII bVII
or in A major = F#m D A E = vi IV I V.

I don't have my guitar handy but just by looking (which isn't all that great a way to find a tonic properly - you have to hear it) I'd say F#m.

Cheers.
Si
#7
Turns out my chart was wrong, I got a better one..lol (here: http://www.answers.com/topic/relative-key )

Also I think I made a typo saying iv (or you made a typo saying vi... whichever)

Also, do you mind explaining what the b in front of the roman numerals means? (I read it somewhere but don't remember (or didn't get it... or both..)

Ah, and the fact I was thinking of my chords as their 'previous' name, rather then the real name would explain why I didn't get which it would fit into. I was thinking Em, not F#m! Won't make that mistake again.

(Looking at it, by adding a Capo a whole step up.. I just changed the chords names by a whole step... <_> amirite? .... lol)

Looking at it (guitars handy, but I'm eating...) I'll agree with (on paper) it looks to be F#m. (which makes my progression i bVI bIII bVII according to you lol (didn't work it out, and I have no idea what the b means :P so I can't yet)

Thanks a ton!


/still a theory noob but I'm trying darn it!




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Last edited by Invokke_Havokk at Mar 13, 2009,
#8
Yeah since you add a capo up two frets the chords are one whole step up.

So the tonic is always notated with a roman numeral I or i depending on whether it is major (upper case) or minor (lower case).

Then each chord is notated in relation to the tonic using roman numerals.

The major scale is notated numerically as 1 2 3 4 5 6 7. All the intervals are major or perfect in quality.

To find the relative minor of a major scale the relative minor will starts from the 6th degree of the major.

So in A major 1=A, 2=B, 3=C#, 4=D, 5=E, 6=F#, 7=G#

Using roman numerals to notate the chords the numbers correspond to the scale degree and the upper case is used to notate major chords and the lower case roman numerals to notate minor chords.

So in the key of A major I=A, ii=Bm, iii=C#m, IV=D, V=E, vi=F#m, viidim=G#dim

This means that in the A major the chord F#m would be vi.
Your progression would be vi - IV - I - V

The minor scale is 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7.
(Note the b prior to the 3 6 and 7? This is why I notate some of the minor chords with a b before them.) In F#m the chords would be F#m=i, G#dim=iidim, A=bIII, Bm=iv, C#m=v, D=bVI, Eb=VII.
Your progression would be i - bVI - bIII - bVII.

Some people don't include the flat assuming that if the tonic is minor then the 3rd 6th and 7th are always flattened naturally. I include the b as I think assumptions make mistakes more likely. Some people do it one way some do it the other way. Whatever you prefer.
Si
#9
Aww, I feel bad now

I figured this out on my own while you were gone, and you did such a nice and wonderful post...

(I literally had nothing better to do with my time then figure out why you put those b's there )

Thanks for the great post anyways if it ever slips my mind I know where to look. ( I go through my previous posts often, check the date, replies, etc. As a check on how much I've improved )

Thanks for all the help.




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