#1
Hi out there!

Do you know any specific characteristics of fusion guitar?
I know that it is has really destinct outside sound, but are there any special guidelines you have to follow if you want to play it?
#2
Given that fusion is little more than the melding of jazz with other genres, and thus one of the most diverse genres in Western music, the answer is "no". The more complex answer is obviously "Why don't you just listen some fusion and copy what they do?".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Quote by verkiII
Hi out there!

Do you know any specific characteristics of fusion guitar?
I know that it is has really destinct outside sound, but are there any special guidelines you have to follow if you want to play it?



I think fusion is probably more about stepping out of guidelines that it is about making them.

The best answer to your question though can be found in the music itself. Listen to, learn, play, and study..... Fusion.
shred is gaudy music
#4
Quote by GuitarMunky
I think fusion is probably more about stepping out of guidelines that it is about making them.

The best answer to your question though can be found in the music itself. Listen to, learn, play, and study..... Fusion.


Well I thought fusion might be a mixture between the 7 modes, but when it's it true that there no "guidelines" in fusion as you say, it seems to be one of the most difficult styles to master.
#5
Quote by verkiII
Well I thought fusion might be a mixture between the 7 modes



Anyway, if you're interested in ANY genre of music, the best thing to do is listen to that genre. Start with players like Allan Holdsworth and Shawn Lane and you'll begin to get more of a sense of what fusion is.
#6
I Fusion is very broad.

Do you mean Jazz fusion, or musical fusion like electronic ambient synths with guitars .

I think you mean the former.

It's basically Jazz with a (incase of Jazz/rock fusion) A Rock twist to it.

Mostly you just play riffs or small vamps, and you solo over it using licks that would not be totally uncommon in jazz.

Use chords with quartal + harmony, or in other words 7th chords+ alterations.

The rock part is, is that you don't necesarily stick in a Jazz strucuture and stylytic team.

So for example, play something like;

Fm7 - EM7 vamp soloing over it using for example a Jazz approach or other influence and then go to for instance : B7 - DM7 and then returning back into the Fm7 - Em7 vamp.

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#7
Quote by :-D


Anyway, if you're interested in ANY genre of music, the best thing to do is listen to that genre. Start with players like Allan Holdsworth and Shawn Lane and you'll begin to get more of a sense of what fusion is.



+1

also check out some Mahavishnu orchestra
shred is gaudy music
#9
Quote by verkiII
Thanks alot!

Is my presumption about the 7 mode mixture so wrong?



Yes. Fusion is a genre.

You can make music that changes between modes and while you could say that you've "fused" them together, it's not what we normally associate the term "fusion" with.
shred is gaudy music
#10
Why is it that everyone makes such a big deal about modes ! it's like if they don't grasp it they are going to burn in musical hell. FAAAACK.

ANYWAY Fusion is cool. Like most people have said; it's a cross of genres, typically people refer to it as Jazz and rock / metal it's a cool genre with no boundries !

I recommend some Planet X, Holdsworth, Greg howe ? Shawn Lane [definitely] and Bret Garsed.
Last edited by Zanon at Mar 14, 2009,
#11
Why is it that everyone makes such a big deal about modes ! it's like if they don't grasp it they are going to burn in musical hell. FAAAACK.


No one says that. The problem is that people with no understanding of music theory think they need to know modes in order to be "metal" or "brootal", and the result is that they completely fail to grasp how modes are used, resulting in the rest of us having to deal with fifty threads a day of "why playing this pattern over a C major progression not sound like locrian?!?11".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
The rock part is, is that you don't necesarily stick in a Jazz strucuture and stylytic team.

I always thought the rock part was just playing it VERY LOUDLY.

>.>

<.<
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#13
Fusion is just Jazz mixed with other genres, most commonly rock, right?

The best advice I can offer is listen to Fusion, of course, and see what the artists themselves do.

However, also listen to Jazz and Rock music, and try to mix and match various ideas yourself.
#14
Check out Al Di Meola (with Return to Forever or solo albums), Jimmy Herring (Jazz is Dead, also featuring Billy Cobham), Tommy Bolin, and any other band Billy Cobham has drummed for.

Alot of the old jazzers have moved towards fusion too...Miles Davis, Wayne Shorter, McCoy Tyner, Herbie Hancock...good stuff.
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Last edited by ramm_ty at Mar 14, 2009,
#15
Quote by GuitarMunky
Yes. Fusion is a genre.

You can make music that changes between modes and while you could say that you've "fused" them together, it's not what we normally associate the term "fusion" with.


Okay, thanks for your correction. I saw fusion more as a style of playing but not as a complete genre. So it is it correct that modes doesn't "fit" in this genre?
(That means that someone who is playing in a specific mode is not actually playing fusion guitar)
#16
You should check out Tribal Tech. The guitarist, Scott Henderson, is one of the most amazing players on the planet.
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