#1
I write songs for every genre and my friend that I play with always says "Lemme figure out what key that is in so I can play a solo/riff"

I want to be able to know what would sound good and what scales to play with what chords.

Is there anyway to explain this?
#2
When I listen to a song, I can usually hear the root note in my head. The most inportant note. So I will just sing that note, then find where it is on my guitar neck.
#4
As a general rule, if you don't change keys in the song, the first chord of a progression will be the key of the song.
So if your song starts in E minor, your friend can just solo in E minor, and it should sound fine. If you change keys in the chorus or bridge, then he should adjust his scale accordingly.
-just a general rule...
#5
You can also figure it out by the chords you are using, along with the progression to know what key its in.
#6
Quote by tonepro
As a general rule, if you don't change keys in the song, the first chord of a progression will be the key of the song.
So if your song starts in E minor, your friend can just solo in E minor, and it should sound fine. If you change keys in the chorus or bridge, then he should adjust his scale accordingly.
-just a general rule...


He's talking bull****. Chord progressions don't always start with the root chord.
If you know your scales over the fretboard, then just play notes and see what sounds alright - it should start to resemble a scale/key.
Also, the above is right, you can normally hear the root note in your head.
And see what notes your jamming people are playing and learn theory.
#7
Usually (again it varies) the song will end on the tonic, and most times in older piano music it also starts on the tonic. You can TRY picking the last note of the song, because it usually resolves to the tonic. Now if you KNOW the song ends on the dominant and your end note is a G you can deduce the song is in C because G is dominant to C. You can usually tell if it ends on the dominant by that feeling of "its not over yet" like at the end of Risen by Shadows Fall. It seems abrupt. Now again nothing is set in stone, but from my personal experience the uncomplete cadences are usually in the dominant key.

Please use tags for tabs....
#8
Is there somewhere on the internet that is credible for teaching music theory?

I'm taking music classes in college but I don't start until the Fall.
#9
Quote by GatPelose
Is there somewhere on the internet that is credible for teaching music theory?

I'm taking music classes in college but I don't start until the Fall.


read the crusade columns
you are what you is
#11
Quote by EdawMail
He's talking bull****. Chord progressions don't always start with the root chord.
If you know your scales over the fretboard, then just play notes and see what sounds alright - it should start to resemble a scale/key.
Also, the above is right, you can normally hear the root note in your head.
And see what notes your jamming people are playing and learn theory.

Um....I said this as a general rule. No, not all songs start with the root chord. This is a general rule to get the guy started. I also stated that, "if the song doesn't change keys", this rule could be applied with good results. If a chord progression is:
Em-G-A-D, then I think and Em scale would sound fine over it. Of course you could switch up the scale once you hit the A-D section to make it more interesting. And I'm sure there's other things you could play over it, too, if you noodled around and experimented.
Last edited by tonepro at Mar 15, 2009,
#12
I don't think Em scale would sound nice over that, tonepro. The Em scale contains a C while an A major contains a C#. Those could clash pretty badly. I mean, it could work, but it wouldn't be my first choice for improv.