#1
Its about an interval, ill delete thread/post as soon as my statement is verified/disproven.

I know a power chord is root-P5, so when you invert that, its a perfect 4th, correct?

So how are those 'inverted power chords' basically minor 3rds?

original power chord:

e|----|
b|----|
g|----|
D|--5-|
A|--3-|
E|----|


'inverted power chord'

e|----|
b|----|
g|----|
D|--3-|
A|--5-|
E|----|


how is that an inverted power chord, shouldnt it technically be


e|----|
b|----|
g|----|
D|--3-|
A|--3-|
E|----|


please help clear this up for me, i know i should know more theory
My last.fm
Quote by OMMad
i've always found pop to be harder to play than metal... especially shred metal... it's just really fast tremolo picking and the occasional palm mute... and the only chords you have to worry about are power chords...
#2
You posted a C power chord so its C and G the second is D and F and the third is C and F which is a perfect 4th

D and F would be a minor 3rd in the key of D I wanna say. Im posting this quick but ill edit if I discover im wrong

edit:

D = F# C#, thats F so its a minor third yes

now the relationship of the two chords im not 100% sure

Please use tags for tabs....
Last edited by Camdon at Mar 14, 2009,
#3
yeah but since a power chord is a perfect 5th, shouldnt an inverted power chord be a perfect fourth, because when you invert perfects they remain perfect.

the 2nd chord is what people say is an inverted power chord, but just the fingering is inverted, not the interval.

is that what they mean? or are they using incorrect terms?
My last.fm
Quote by OMMad
i've always found pop to be harder to play than metal... especially shred metal... it's just really fast tremolo picking and the occasional palm mute... and the only chords you have to worry about are power chords...
#5
Quote by Colton165
yeah but since a power chord is a perfect 5th, shouldnt an inverted power chord be a perfect fourth, because when you invert perfects they remain perfect.

the 2nd chord is what people say is an inverted power chord, but just the fingering is inverted, not the interval.

is that what they mean? or are they using incorrect terms?


Pretty sure they are only speaking of the finger positions...




Please add me if as a friend I helped! (I like to think I'm a friendly person)
#6
Quote by Colton165
Its about an interval, ill delete thread/post as soon as my statement is verified/disproven.

I know a power chord is root-P5, so when you invert that, its a perfect 4th, correct?

So how are those 'inverted power chords' basically minor 3rds?

original power chord:

e|----|
b|----|
g|----|
D|--5-|
A|--3-|
E|----|


'inverted power chord'

e|----|
b|----|
g|----|
D|--3-|
A|--5-|
E|----|


how is that an inverted power chord, shouldnt it technically be


e|----|
b|----|
g|----|
D|--3-|
A|--3-|
E|----|


please help clear this up for me, i know i should know more theory



okay 3 and 5 you've got your basic C chord a root and fifth [C, G]

when it is 5 3 like the second one you have a new chord it is D on bottom and F on the top which is a basic d minor chord without the fifth

edit: the last chord is an F chord because of the C and F, you're just missing an a
if you make it 5 on top [A] 3 3 on bottom you've got what we call an F chord in First inversion. [when the third is on bottom]
Member #40 of the Steve Irwin Memorial Club, pm Clincher09 to join.
Last edited by nivlarama at Mar 14, 2009,
#7
the D and the F isn't an inverted power chord, and anyone who says that is wrong. an "inverted power chord" just has the 5th as the lowest not. so to use your C power chord as an example, it's inverted form would be 5 on D string and 5 on the G string. The other "inverted power chord" you posted is an inversion of an F power chord, not a C. Learn intervals and chord building, it will help you out.


Quote by Camdon
You posted a C power chord so its C and G the second is D and F and the third is C and F which is a perfect 4th

D and F would be a minor 3rd in the key of D I wanna say. Im posting this quick but ill edit if I discover im wrong

edit:

D = F# C#, thats F so its a minor third yes

now the relationship of the two chords im not 100% sure

D to F is a minor 3rd regardless of the key, just to let you know


EDIT:
Quote by nivlarama
edit: the last chord is an F chord because of the C and F, you're just missing an a
if you make it 5 on top [A] 3 3 on bottom you've got what we call an F chord in First inversion. [when the third is on bottom]

While you have the right idea, you can't call it an F chord because there's no third and no context for it to be in. You have no idea if it's F major or F minor. There's no third, so you can't call it an F chord. Besides, with the C as the bass note like how I think you're describing it, it'd be second inversion because C is the 5th.
Last edited by JakdOnCrack at Mar 14, 2009,
#8
the only thing I've ever heard called an inverted powerchord is this:

|-
|-
|-
|-7
|-5
|-5

which is correct in both the fingering AND the interval.