#1
So I have gone through the stickies and what not, and I have done a material finish on one of my guitars so yeah. I was originally planning on chemically stripping the finish off the bass but on the tutorial (project-guitar) it says recommended for bodies that have already been refinished. Will it not work as well on a non-refinished body? I have read through some tutorials and it said stripping the body isnt completely necessary, and that a little scuffing will do the trick. Is that really fine?

Can I just use standard duplicolor auto paint? I dont think they have the color I want (Orange) so how is rustoleum or krylon for guitar bodies? Whats best? laquer, acrylic, enamel? I really don't want to wait weeks for the paint to cure before wetsanding and what not, a couple of days maximum. WHenever I refinished my last guitar, I waited 2 days after putting the final polyurethane coats before polishing and it was fine (granted it is completely different than regular paint :/ )

But yeah basically my plan was

Strip body.
Sand with 320 grit
Primer (3 coats)
Sand with 400 grit
Color (5-6 coats)
sand with 800 grit
Clear (10 coats or something)
Wet sand with 1000, 1500, and 2000
Buff with 3M compound

Would that be good enough? I am just going for a simple single color job

Thanks
#2
Not a bad plan.

If the guitar has its original finish on it, then there is no need to sand it all off.

Scuff it back with P220 on a block, to remove the gloss etc.

Get a decent Primer. You can get 2K primer in cans these days if you look.

Give it two coats of primer.

When that dries, sand to P400.

Spray a mist coat of a contrasting colour, lightly over the body. This is a guide coat.

Block sand lightly with P400 on a block.

Any dents etc will be revealed, because the guide coat will stay in them.

Fill any dents with epoxy putty and smooth over.

Prime any areas that you filled, then do teh whole body again (so the filled areas get two coats)

Block that again with P400.

Ideally, put some latex gloves on and wipe the body down with panel wipe, to remove any contaminants, if you do, don't touch it with bare skin afterwards.

Now apply your colour. 5 coats shouldn't really be required, but whatever gives an even colour. (What colour exactly?)

If it is a solid colour (non metallic), you can lightly wet sand it with P600. Expect it to look flat afterwards. If metallic, you MUST clear it first.

Try and buy some 2K Clear coat in a can and apply those 3 coats at a time.

Bung 3 coats on, let it cure over night and wet sand to P600, then apply another 3 coats, let it cure.

Then you can start with your P1000 wet up to P2000 or so and then buff it with 3M (Finesse it 3?)

Enjoy.
#4
2K, 2 Pack etc. is a catalysed paint that requires two parts (the paint and the hardener) it is what car spray shops use for primer and lacquer.

It cures quickly (24 hours) and is very hard.

Normally it comes in tins, which you mix together then spray with a compressor, but it is now available in 400ml ish spray cans.

if you search on bay for 2k spray, you should find some in spray cans.

Obviously, your orange colour (metallic?) won't be 2k, but you should check that it is compatible with your 2k clear coat (should be!)

If you don't want to be waiting weeks to buff, then 2k is your answer.
#5
Its just solid orange (non-metalic)

I can wet sand duplicolor paint after a couple of days cant I?
#6
Quote by bboyjon
Its just solid orange (non-metalic)

I can wet sand duplicolor paint after a couple of days cant I?



Yeah if it's solid colour and dry.

Try an keep it warm for a couple of days and just go easy on it.

You could also paint up a sample in exactly the same way (primer etc) so you can test that, before sanding the guitar.
#7
Is the sanding on the primer coats wet sanding or is dry sanding good enough?
#8
dry should be fine for primer, you want some material adhesion as well.
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Shwiggity.
#9
Quote by deftonesordie
dry should be fine for primer, you want some material adhesion as well.



^^^ This.

Wet sanding is only for really smoothing out a surface.

So unless wet sanding is suggested, assume it s dry, but always use a block, expect on edges. Use palm of your hand and go over them, not along them.,
#10
I dont completely understand the go over them not along them.

Like do I go up and down on the edges (body is on its back, and top is facing me) (back of body to top) or do I go side to side (same orientation of the body) but just sliding on the edges? I am guessing I should not do the latter?

Are there any pros/cons to completely stripping the body over just scuffing the original finish and painting over it?
#11
Quote by bboyjon
I dont completely understand the go over them not along them.

Like do I go up and down on the edges (body is on its back, and top is facing me) (back of body to top) or do I go side to side (same orientation of the body) but just sliding on the edges? I am guessing I should not do the latter?

Are there any pros/cons to completely stripping the body over just scuffing the original finish and painting over it?


Up and down = Over
Side to side = Along

If the body looks OK, when scuffed then you should be fine.

Advantage of stripping back, is you know exactly what state the wood is in when you start and you know exactly what primer and so on is on there.
#12
So will rustoleum or krylon paint work for this? I would go duplicolor but I dont think they have orange (atleast not on their website)