#1
I blocked my Floyd rose recently, and my friend, who struggles with tuning his, wanted his blocked too. So I got his ESP LTD V series guitar,and MAN, he's got some thick strings on that puppy. The highest I go is .050 for the low E. He's got a .070 on it. Looks like his range is .014-.070. Anyways, his tremolo always angled up instead being close to flush making the action very high, and hard to play.
Ive got it blocked, intonated, and tuned. Works great, except the string just seem to high. Ive tried adjusting the bridge and setting it lower, but the thicker strings buzz when fretting. If I raise the heavy side of bridge and lower the higher side, there is still some buzz. I got it set where there is no buzzing, but my friend wanted it to have a fast feel like my Jackson Kelly. Do you know if its possible with those heavy strings to get real close action, cause I'm doubting it? Or do you guys have some suggestions?
#2
I'm doubting it. My RR3 has pretty low action, but my high E string (or C cause of its tuning) buzzes from 1st to 3rd fret. With .11's.

Maybe it's my setup. Gotta raise the action on that bitch.
#3
Your friend needs to play lighter gague(spelling?) strings. What tuning is it in?











(^ the end of the world)
#4
Quote by Chase_Jarvis23
Your friend needs to play lighter gague(spelling?) strings. What tuning is it in?

gauge
But yeah, I doubt it's possible. I presume that he doesn't play in standard does he?
A hero of war, Yeah that's what I'll be

(.)(.)..........(.)(.)..........(.)(.)..........(.)(.)..........(.)(.)..........(.)(.)..........(.)(.)
#5
From what I know, heavier strings vibrate with a smaller amplitude than lighter ones, so thick ones usually buzz less than thin ones and can therefore be set lower. But .14 is a bit extreme, I have no experience with such fat strings. A pack of strings costs 5 bucks, just buy some lighter ones and see if it gets better.
#6
I wouldn't be surprised if those strings seriously bent his neck.This seems like one of those specialty set ups you take to a good tech and explain completely beforehand
Want: EH Deluxe Memory Man, Warmoth Strat, Budda Superdrive 45
#7
Well, to be honest, my friend knows guitars, but knows little about playing them. Whenever he's asked my to shred something, I can't since its tuned all weird. He knows nothing about tuning, scales etc. He just kind plays around with it, mainly changing tuning. So its not in any real tuning, well, now it is cause I tuned it to straight D cause standard E wasn't working with the superfat strings, They're like Bass strings. I think bullets34 might be right about the neck. The fret buzz seems to be in random spots over the fretboard. I know he never beefed it up prior to getting super super heavys. Anyways, Its playable but no way in hell could you solo with it. Ive been telling him for years to start with the basics (E tuning) learning scales and chords, then experiment with other tunings. He loves metal, so maybe I'll throw some D'addario XL I've got laying around on his AX, and maybe see the metal can be done just fine with lighter strings. He might like them. Thanks for your replys guys
Last edited by Sick Man at Mar 15, 2009,
#8
I'm a part time guitar tech. Those heavy strings will have a hi tension on the neck and with a perfect no buzz setup the first fret has to be the highest and the last fret at the lowest point. You should try tightening the truss rod clockwise to counteract the tension of the strings.

As it stands the fretboard will be in a concave bow shape and this necessary to a degree because it needs to compensate for the shape of the vibrating stings. However if the bow is too deep then you have to press the string down really far to fret the note which will take it lower than the frets at the high end of the neck hence causing them to buzz. Tightening the truss rod will remove some of the bow and should hopefully reduce the buzzing although you'll probably need to readjust the intonation.

Only tighten the truss rod a quarter turn at a time then hold the bottom E down at the first fret and the last fret at the same time. This will allow you to see how much bow is in the neck. If the guitar in question has a fairly flat fretboard radius then you should be able to get away with about a 0.5mm gap above the 9th fret when the string is held down at the first and last fret. Thicker strings will require an even larger gap.
#9
Quote by Whitey1980s
As it stands the fretboard will be in a concave bow shape and this necessary to a degree because it needs to compensate for the shape of the vibrating stings. However if the bow is too deep then you have to press the string down really far to fret the note which will take it lower than the frets at the high end of the neck hence causing them to buzz. Tightening the truss rod will remove some of the bow and should hopefully reduce the buzzing although you'll probably need to readjust the intonation.

Yeah, not only a problem with fret buzz, put you do have to push the string down quite a ways to fret your note, which is why I said soloing would be damn near impossible. I check into tightening the truss rod, but will check with my buddy first. I done working on it today, but plan on inspecting its structure closer tomarrow. Thanks for the advise on that though...
#10
I got the guitar fairly well setup, about as good as it will get. I inspected it a little close today and thought I'd add one more post on what I found. Close to where the neck meets the body, there is a thin crack and both sides of the neck, which even continues up on the fret board. I think those huge strings my friends been using did indeed CRACK is neck, just like you said. I've never seen that happen before, but never used anything that thick before either. I think that might have something to do with its poor action, and not much more I can do. Thanks again guys
#11
Quote by bullets34
I wouldn't be surprised if those strings seriously bent his neck.This seems like one of those specialty set ups you take to a good tech and explain completely beforehand

Because people TOTALLY use 14-70 gauge strings to play in standard

That's the perfect gauge for baritone (A standard), and you should be able to get the action fairly low as long as the truss rod is adjusted properly. Is the neck bowing any?
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
#12
I'm not a guitr tech by any means, but have played for many many years. I think its bowing since the action on the higher frets is nearly double than the lower frets. The crack I found kinda concerns me, even though theres no gap in the crack. But Yes, the neck is bowing.