#1
what are things like a flated fith or minor 3rd and things like that in modes i read about it in the theory faq guide but it still confused me like in c major it has a dominant 5th or something like that i want to know what all those mean and why there there
P.S. this is what the alphabet would look like without the letters Q and R
#3
well a flatted minor third is you go to the third of the minor scale for whatever key you're in, and then you flat it, (hope i'm right here, or else i just looked very foolish)
This is how the world ends.
#4
a minor third is just a flattened third of a major scale not a minor scale man, the build up of a minor chord is the 1st, 5th and flattened 2rd notes of the major scale
#5
Quote by noddy-whack
dude if you knew your major scale you would know

no it says like whatevre mode ov whatever major scale has like a dominent minor 7th or a major fith and it makes no sense to me
P.S. this is what the alphabet would look like without the letters Q and R
#7
Ionian: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Dorian: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7
Phrygian: 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Lydian: 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7
Mixolydian: 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7
Aeolian: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Locrian: 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7

k what does that mean i know # means the note is sharped and b means flated
but i dont understand what it means if its the same notes why is it shaped or flated
P.S. this is what the alphabet would look like without the letters Q and R
#8
Basically, different types of scales are determined by different combinations of whole steps and half steps. By changing the order of whole steps in half steps of the scale you change its overall sound. The major scale is spelled W-W-H-W-W-W-H (W=whole step, H=half step). This results in the root note, a major second, a major third, a perfect fourth, a perfect fifth, a major sixth, a major and a perfect octave (same as the root note, just higher). If you start a C Major scale (CDEFGABC) on its sixth note, A, you get the A Minor scale (ABCDEFGA). The minor scale is spelled W-H-W-W-H-W-W, which gives you the root note, a major second, a minor third, a perfect fourth, a perfect fifth, a minor sixth, a minor seventh, and the octave. Hope that makes sense...
Last edited by AbstractDeth7X at Mar 15, 2009,
#9
The mixolydian mode has a minor seventh and the locrian mode contains a diminished fifth. You should probably worry about the major scale for now, and learn intervals properly.
#10
Quote by AbstractDeth7X
Basically, different types of scales are determined by different combinations of whole steps and half steps. By changing the order of whole steps in half steps of the scale you change its overall sound. The major scale is spelled W-W-H-W-W-W-H (W=whole step, H=half step). This results in the root note, a major second, a major third, a perfect fourth, a perfect fifth, a major sixth, a major and a perfect octave (same as the root note, just higher). If you start a C Major scale (CDEFGABC) on its sixth note, A, you get the A Minor scale (ABCDEFGA). The minor scale is spelled W-H-W-W-H-W-W, which gives you the root note, a major second, a minor third, a perfect fourth, a perfect fifth, a minor sixth, a minor seventh, and the octave. Hope that makes sense...


it doesnt..... it really doesnt
P.S. this is what the alphabet would look like without the letters Q and R