#1
ok so I got this music theory book i read it for a while got through all the interval crap, started doing the circle of fiths, all the scales, and making triads......but what about progressions.

My friends dad is really good at guitar and he said i should forget music theory and just train my ear and that music theory is bull**** (even though he has learned some of it).

I wanna be able to build of stuff i create and stay in key or follow progressions.
#2
Your friends dad is an idiot. A complete and total idiot.

So progressions, alright. First things first, I'll be doing this for major scale progressions.

The chords in a major scale are - Given are the triads and quadads.

1 - Tonic - Major - Major 7th
2 - Supertonic - minor - Minor 7th
3 - Mediant - minor - Minor 7th
4 - Subdominant - Major - Major 7th
5 - Dominant - Major - Dominant 7th
6 - Submediant - minor - Minor 7th
7 - Leading tone - diminished - min 7 flat 5

So the chords for the C major scale would Be - Cmaj, Dm, Em, Fmaj, Gmaj, Am, and B dim.

Common chord progressions. The most common chord progression has to be 1-4-5, which is using all the major chords possible in the scale. So, in C major, that would be C-F-G

Other progressions are:
1 2 5 1
1 3 2 5 1
1 6 4 5 1
1 6 2 5 1
ETC.

Anyways (this is taken from Michael Millers music theory book - I reccomend it to you.)
These chords can lead to (but are not limited to) other certain chords.

1 - Can lead to anything
2- 5, 4 and 7
3- 2 5, 6
4- 1, 3, 5, 7
5 - 1
6 - 2, 4, 5, 1
7 - 1, 3

So if you want to get into songwriting etc, write down some progressions that sound good together to you - write in 12 or 8 bar sections, anything really - then play simple melodies over it.

P.S. Check out Michael Millers complete Idiot's guide to music theory.
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Last edited by Rickjames730 at Mar 17, 2009,