#1
Im primarily a bassist, but I play a bit of everything. Ive been wondering how to put emotion into my music. When I hear for example Eric Clapton, I can feel all the emotion he is putting into it, but I cant get that same feeling from my own music. I feel the emotion when Im playing, but when I listen back to it it just doesnt have the same feeling to it. What are some things I could work on or tips for putting emotion into my music?

If it makes any difference, I write alot of different types of stuff, but mostly acoustic fingerpicking and softer rock with strings and piano. (Think coldplay)
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#2
There isn't any tip or thing to work on to put emotion in. You can't always hear emotion in the music once it's recorded, but only in it's purest form, live. As much as I love complex basslines, usually the bass is about keeping rhythm, so I don't generally hear much emotion in it. There are some players though.

But for putting it into guitar, there is no tip or method. That kid sitting there playing Smoke On The Water is putting emotion into it. You put emotion in whenever you play and have some sort of emotional reaction. If you do it just to get laid or noticed or something you don't feel it, but whenever you get something out of it, there's emotion in your playing.
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#3
I have to say with the bass it is like above posted said about rhythm.

I think one of the things with having emotion is being into the song. You have to get lost in it. When you are just playing the notes but playing a song it seems to come from the heart. Something that can help you get into it is kinda rocking your body more to it. Close your eyes some, and be one with the music. Let the music flow from you. Get lost in the song so to speak.

That's how it is for me at least >_>, others might disagree.
#4
It's getting the emotion across in an audible manner that's the problem.

As you become more skilled with the guitar, you will instinctively add dynamics, subtle bends, harmonics and vibrato which, without consciously trying to, expresses emotion.
#6
I ment mostly in my guitar playing. I feel it when Im playing it, but it never sounds the same when I play it back.
Quote by Yakult
If I get a boner I generally pass out due to the massive amount of blood having to be redirected from my brain


Quote by DubStar92
I like to video record myself when I'm drunk. It's like a mini-movie. I love fapping to the sex scene.
#7
^lol. Varying degrees of strumming force also helps. There are a lot of subtle things about it really.
#9
Quote by Chaos Nil
^lol. Varying degrees of strumming force also helps. There are a lot of subtle things about it really.

Thanks for the reply, i think this is it. Im still learning and mostly self taught, so I dont really catch on or know about all the little things that go on. I guess when Im playing I hear some of it in my head and it doesnt translate the same when I play it.
Quote by Yakult
If I get a boner I generally pass out due to the massive amount of blood having to be redirected from my brain


Quote by DubStar92
I like to video record myself when I'm drunk. It's like a mini-movie. I love fapping to the sex scene.
Last edited by Ktool The Girth at Mar 17, 2009,
#10
In all honesty palm mutes add tons of emotion. A lot goes with the force on your strum, how much of the pick is hitting the strings. In your case of fingerpicking you can pick softly or hard. Its like on a piano, smashing the keys has a different emotion than gently pressing. Another thing is when you do lets say two down strums, and the first only hits a few of the first strings, and the second goes the full length of the chord.
#11
If you are playing what sounds right to you, you are playing with emotion. There are far more emotions than merely the sad bluesy ones. Though I find a few things help - get good control over your picking hand, and of your bending and vibrato, as used in different amounts can get different tonal colours.
#12
D minor is the saddest key
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#13
John frusciante puts more emotion in than anyone
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#14
If you really wanna play with emotion don't consciously think it out. Just close your eyes and let 'er rip. Play what you FEEL with your heart, not your head.
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#15
Dynamics. Going from fast to slow, slow to fast, heavy strumming to light strumming, etc, etc. Just don't play like a robot.
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