#1
right know I have my monitors connected to my audio interface. but I recently bought a sampler. I been using the sampler with head phones but can connect both devices.
#3
This is an excellent example of why mixers are NOT irrelevant in today's home studios.

Rather than jacking around with adapters and splitters and stuff, just get yourself a little Behringer mixer or something. (little wee ones can be had for quite cheaply. Run your sampler and your interface into it, and then the outputs of the mixer to your monitors.

The advantage of this is that, if you wind up getting something else, you can just plug it into the mixer too. If you rely on adapters and splitters.... you'll have to wind up buying more adapters and splitters. (and ultimately having a mess of stuff that doesn't look nice, for about the same amount of money you would have spent on the little wee mixer in the first place.) You also have a great deal more flexibility.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Mar 17, 2009,
#4
Yep, nice easy solution.

They do prove to be irrelevant in many, if not most, situations though, as a lot of people don't have need for the extra routing options.


EDIT: People on this website, anyway.
There is poetry in despair.
#5
Quote by axemanchris
This is an excellent example of why mixers are NOT irrelevant in today's home studios.

Rather than jacking around with adapters and splitters and stuff, just get yourself a little Behringer mixer or something. (little wee ones can be had for quite cheaply. Run your sampler and your interface into it, and then the outputs of the mixer to your monitors.

The advantage of this is that, if you wind up getting something else, you can just plug it into the mixer too. If you rely on adapters and splitters.... you'll have to wind up buying more adapters and splitters. (and ultimately having a mess of stuff that doesn't look nice, for about the same amount of money you would have spent on the little wee mixer in the first place.) You also have a great deal more flexibility.

CT


+1 on a mixer in this case, although I suggest going with Tapco over Behringer as I have not had any good luck with Behringer mixers in the past....neither has my school.....they just upgraded to a nice Mackie Onyx 2480
#6
Meh.... I've had an MX802 that *never* gave me a lick of trouble. I upgraded a few years ago to a UB2442-FX-PRO, which had a channel die a week out of the box. I brought it back to the store who gave me a replacement right away while mine was sent out to be repaired (I had already registered the warranty). Mine came back fixed just fine, and hasn't caused me any grief since.

So.... I'm probably looking at the better part of ten years now with one problem that had me down for a grand total of about half an hour.

The thing about Behringer, I think, is that you have to treat it nicely. If you beat the crap out of it (which a lot of things do in a 'student' environment), it tends to not stand up quite so well. Sound quality and features, though... there's no advantage to spending the extra 50% by getting a Mackie.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.