#1
Hey , wanted to ask that if ive learned the C major scale in all 5 position by hearth , then can i play that same scale in A minor ? I mean , the notes are all same .
And if i learn G major scales , i could play same scale in E minor , F major scale in D minor , A major scale in F# minor , B major scale in g minor etc .

Then i dont have to learn so many scales .
Is that true ?
Could i do that ?

Ty .
#2
Yes and no.

You will be able to play both, but the sound depends on the chords.

playing an C note over a C major chord will sound major, playing it over an Am chord and it will sound minor and playing it over an B Major chord will make it sound dominant, and playing it over an Eb Major chord will change it to a Lydian sound (Eb#11).

You must learn intervals to understand how scales work over harmony/chords.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 17, 2009,
#5
Quote by Guitarpwner
Hey , wanted to ask that if ive learned the C major scale in all 5 position by hearth , then can i play that same scale in A minor ? I mean , the notes are all same .
And if i learn G major scales , i could play same scale in E minor , F major scale in D minor , A major scale in F# minor , B major scale in g minor etc .

Then i dont have to learn so many scales .
Is that true ?
Could i do that ?

Ty .


Then you need to learn how to spell. The guy was just trying to help you. No need to be an asshole.
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You almost banged her? Well you get an almost high five!

*Stops half way*
#6
Quote by boxie
Then you need to learn how to spell. The guy was just trying to help you. No need to be an asshole.


ty; 2nd edit, If I may;


Quote by Guitarpwner

Hey , I wanted to ask that if ive learned the C major scale in all 5 position by hearth , then can i play that same scale in A minor ? I mean , the notes are all the same, and if i learn G major scales , i could play the same scale in E minor , F major scale in D minor , A major scale in F# minor , B major scale in g minor etc .

Then i dont have to learn so many scales .
Is that true ?
Could i do that ?

Ty .


Anyways, no hard feelings. I'm not here to learn/teach how to spell/read, please rephrase what you want to know then.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 17, 2009,
#7
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Yes and no.

You will be able to play both, but the sound depends on the chords.

playing an C note over a C major chord will sound major, playing it over an Am chord and it will sound minor and playing it over an B Major chord will make it sound dominant, and playing it over an Eb Major chord will change it to a Lydian sound (Eb#11).

You must learn intervals to understand how scales work over harmony/chords.


Isn't the dominant the 3rd step, in this case the E, from the scale? Shouldn't you play an E chord under the C note? I'm just learning some music theory, so correct me if I'm wrong
#8
yea im sorry im asshole , sometimes .
anyway you know that the C major and a minor has same notes ,
F major and d minor have same notes , G major and e minor have same notes etc .
And i wanted to know that when the song is in a minor , then do i can use the C major scale ? becouse the notes are the same ? right ?

i just ment that if i take the one scale and play it in the different key , where is same notes , then i just dont have to learn some many scales for every key .

what u did wrong was u just took that C to every key i wrote there .
and about the intervals , i can recognize the intervals by ear easily , i can build them , i can do everything with them coz ive finished music school , main instrument piano .
#10
Quote by Keth
Isn't the dominant the 3rd step, in this case the E, from the scale? Shouldn't you play an E chord under the C note? I'm just learning some music theory, so correct me if I'm wrong


Yes srry I made an error in my example; I meant D Major chord.

Quote by Guitarpwner
yea im sorry im asshole , sometimes .
anyway you know that the C major and a minor has same notes ,
F major and d minor have same notes , G major and e minor have same notes etc .
And i wanted to know that when the song is in a minor , then do i can use the C major scale ? becouse the notes are the same ? right ?

i just ment that if i take the one scale and play it in the different key , where is same notes , then i just dont have to learn some many scales for every key .

what u did wrong was u just took that C to every key i wrote there .
and about the intervals , i can recognize the intervals by ear easily , i can build them , i can do everything with them coz ive finished music school , main instrument piano .


That's also why I said Yes, and No.

The same note/scale only changes if you change the chords/harmony.

The opposite of that is, whether you supposedly play A minor or C Major over a C major chord, will both be the same, since the notes don't changes.

In order to use A minor scale, you'd have to use an Am chord.

That's why you should learn intervals, so you understand which notes (scale) will work over an chord. Or else it's just guessing.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 17, 2009,
#11
I think he's trying to explain that he's just discovered the relative minor of keys.
No means maybe
#12
TS, yes, if you learn the shapes of C major you also know the shapes of A minor, plus you only have to move those shapes up and down the fretboard for all the other scales....but I think what darren's saying is that there is a lot more to scales than being able to memorise shapes. You need to understand how they are constructed and how they work to be able to use them effectively. Just being able to play a scale doesn't do you any good - you need to be able to use it to make music