#1
I want to get into recording, but I still need to purchase a mic. I'll be mainly recording electric guitars, some acoustic, and minimal vocals. I'll want to record anywhere from warm, tight-bass cleans to high-gain fuzz/distortion.

I've been looking at dynamic mics, the Shure SM57 and Sennheiser e609 in particular, and have a few questions.

If I were to go with the SM57, is it worth the extra $40 to get a Beta 57A? Same with the e609, is it worth the extra $80 to get the e906? What I've read is that these mics will give me the warmth I look for, and can easily handle the gain I'll be throwing at them.

although, for warmth, should I look into a decent condenser instead? (ribbons are out of the question, I dont have that kind of money to throw down)
#2
Yes if you want that warm tone I suggest a good quality Condenser. How about the Rode NT1A?
It's a very nice mic but may be out of your price range at just over $200.

The Studio Projects B1 is another good choice when it comes to condensers.

I like the SM57 but it's not amazing for Acoustic or vocals if you ask me.
#3
Quote by moody07747
Yes if you want that warm tone I suggest a good quality Condenser. How about the Rode NT1A?
It's a very nice mic but may be out of your price range at just over $200.

The Studio Projects B1 is another good choice when it comes to condensers.

I like the SM57 but it's not amazing for Acoustic or vocals if you ask me.



+ 1
I am a recent convert to the Rode NT1-A. I also have a shure SM57 and an AKG c1000s. I am by no means the most knowledgeable chappie here, but the Rode is now my go to mic. + it comes with a shock mount which will always look impressive

definitley worth holding out for a while to get a new one, but you can get them used on ebay.
EPILPSTDYamahaRBX100BassTanglewoodTW28/STRFenderchamp600CubaseStudio5Saffirepro40AlesisM1ActiveMKIIMAudioKeystation88RodeNT1AShureSM57KeeleyModTS9MackieMCUwww.myspace.com/cuthbertgriswald
#5
I am not sure that the Rode will work well on the guitar cab. It is a great mic for vocals and acoustic but I stick with dynamic mics mostly for guitar cabs. Maybe look for an SM57 or the e609 and the Rode used. If you are on a tight budget.
Originally posted by arrrgg
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#6
Quote by Led man32
I am not sure that the Rode will work well on the guitar cab. It is a great mic for vocals and acoustic but I stick with dynamic mics mostly for guitar cabs. Maybe look for an SM57 or the e609 and the Rode used. If you are on a tight budget.

Absolutely spot-on advice here.
#7
Quote by Led man32
I am not sure that the Rode will work well on the guitar cab.


Cleans/modest crunch are certainly good on a 30 watt tube amp - I'm very much a complete noob when it comes to anything other than dynamics, so I'm not too sure about high gain and or high volume. I also dont get the opportunity to turn up very often

the manual says:

"In the absence of a PAD it may be necessary to move the microphone further from the speaker to avoid distortion when loud volume is used"

So yeah I agree with Led man32 - try to get one of each used - that way you have more bases covered as well I suppose. I'd certainly enquire as to how well the condenser mic had been looked after though.....though perhaps I am just picky If you buy a shure via ebay, beware of fakes - its absolutley chocked full of them in Europe - not sure about the states though

Actually, the Rode site has a really cool little series of films etc on their mics - I think its called Rode univeristy or something - loads of quality useable info (IMHO) if you can be arsed to watched them
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#8
I have an NT-1 and it is my go-to mic for lead vocals and assorted other stuff. I've never considered using it on guitar cab. Based on what I know of it from recording other sources, I have a feeling I wouldn't like it on guitar cab.

But then again.... large diaphragm condensors will exhibit that proximity effect - that is, when you get up closer to the mic, there is an increased bass response. Maybe that's what you're looking for.

The Rode site says the NT1-A has an SPL rating of 137 db. (SPL means sound pressure level.... or in other words, roughly how loud a source the mic can handle before it sh!ts the bed).

This chart here puts that in perspective....

http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/st/DB_SPL.html

So, I guess you'd be fine.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Quote by Led man32
I am not sure that the Rode will work well on the guitar cab. It is a great mic for vocals and acoustic but I stick with dynamic mics mostly for guitar cabs. Maybe look for an SM57 or the e609 and the Rode used. If you are on a tight budget.


I prefer condenser mics for guitar cabs actually, it depends on what kind of sound you want, you do however have to be careful with the volume level though, because condenser mics overload relatively easily and can be damaged by extremely high volumes.
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#10
I am reluctant to close mic with a condenser for the reasons Kid mentioned. While the SM57 is not a glamorous mic, it is a hammer with a diaphragm! Can't break it.

Sometimes I will close mic with the 57, and use a Shure KSM27 about 4 to 10 feet away. The KSM27 is also a wonderful vox mic.
#11
Condensers work on cabs, they just don't sound the same as dynamics. I quite like them on older, lower gain tube amps like twin reverbs. They preserve the detail and clarity.

Usually It's best to record a condenser and a dynamic simultaneously and blend them.
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#12
Quote by revtfunk
I am reluctant to close mic with a condenser for the reasons Kid mentioned.


It really depends on the mic. I was surprised that the NT1-A could handle SPLs up to 137db. I was also surprised fairly recently that the Neumann U87 could withstand the abuse that a kick drum would give it. (that from Neumann themselves....)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Quote by axemanchris
It really depends on the mic. I was surprised that the NT1-A could handle SPLs up to 137db. I was also surprised fairly recently that the Neumann U87 could withstand the abuse that a kick drum would give it. (that from Neumann themselves....)

CT


This is trye, and there are some condensers that are made for close micing amps as well, but you still gotta be careful, I doubt you'd find one that could hold up against a cranked 100 watter or something.
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#14
Quote by moody07747
I like the SM57 but it's not amazing for Acoustic or vocals if you ask me.



I agree. The shure SM57 is great for micing guitar cabs. When it comes to vocals, it makes you sound nasaly and sick (but I sing like $hit so wut do I know). I have never tried micing an acoustic guitar with the SM57..something I may need to try later on today.
#15
i'll try and pick up a dynamic and a condenser, and mix the two together. I'll look at the Shure KSM27 as well as the Rode NT1-A.

but my question of price:quality still stands about the SM57 versus the Beta 57A. is it worth the extra money to get the Beta 57A in comparison to the normal SM57?


and for all the awesome help you all have given so far!


addendum: and for the record, i'll mainly by micing my tiny terror, volume wont be anything overly loud, and it will be pretty evenly split between punchy cleans and heavy distorted tones. i'll use the condenser for acoustic/vocals.
Last edited by Skierinanutshel at Mar 18, 2009,
#16
I like the SM-57 Beta, because it can handle vox better making it a bit more versatile, but it does sound different. I would suggest trying both out if you have any way to do so.
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#17
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
This is trye, and there are some condensers that are made for close micing amps as well, but you still gotta be careful, I doubt you'd find one that could hold up against a cranked 100 watter or something.


Sound dB-SPL
Jet engine at 3m 140
Threshold of pain 130
Rock concert 120

.... considering that SPL is logarithmic, (every 10 db measuring roughly 10x the 'ten' that came before it) 137 db is going to be about 7x louder than the threshold of pain, which is itself 10x louder than a rock concert.


Yeah.... I figure you could get away with miking a guitar cab at close range. That is, of course, assuming their SPL tolerance is measured accurately.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#18
Yeah I think they may be measuring a tad high, or that's just happens to be really really resilient mic, my experience is that generally condenser mics don't handle high volumes very well, and that serves as a general rule (which may have some exceptions.)
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