#1
Hello.

I've recently discovered that taking good care of your gear can be a benefit to sound quality and your wallet - who'd have thought?

So upon discovering that I probably have a problem with one of my cables you could imagine my frustration. The end of one of the jacks looks like it is rusting (nothing new) and I'm quite sure that I'm constantly having signal problems through various amps and instruments.

Winding your cables and tieing them sounds like a good way to protect them from harm.

So, what winding method would you reccomend?

For the meantime I've been been using the wrap around the elbow method - is this safe or could it be improved?
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#2
Probably fine, just don't wind the cables in really tight loops to prevent breaking copper wire. I use twist ties sometimes to keep the cable wound when not in use
#3
i use the wrapping round the elbow method too
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#4
Cheers you two.

I'm currently using real ties to keep mine wound when not in use. I've thrown all the proper cable ties I've had out because well what does an ignorant musician need them for .

Tie's are fun though. It's a novelty having a wallace and gromit cable tie

It is very reassuring that Dave is on the who to listen to list.

Off Topic: like the sig Dave.
I collect clothes and IKEA furniture. Who are you?
#5
I fold the cable end to end, then fold again, and again if it's long enough... then I tie a big knot in the middle. Keeps it tidy and compact.

This way you just un-knot it, and throw one end to uncoil it without any tangles.

Last edited by 667 at Mar 17, 2009,
#6
Nice one 667. That's very neat and compact and probably a little quicker.
I collect clothes and IKEA furniture. Who are you?
#7
when winding my cords, especially longer ones i start with a semi large loop probably from my wrist to my elbow, and then i let the cord tell me what direction it wants to go, and end up winding it pretty well without it trying to slip out at all.
dont try to stereotype crusties, its just a dumb move
#8
Thanks Ryan.
It's also good for the times when you need to swap out or test short pedal coupler cables, and you've run out of them.
#10
Quote by Ryan D' Ale


It is very reassuring that Dave is on the who to listen to list.

Off Topic: like the sig Dave.




i don't think i'm on the list for how i tie my cables, though and now i think of it, i just coil them round slightly now, as recently i changed to shorter cables which i don't really need to tie up...
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#11
BTW, Home Depot sells rolls of velcro strips that are designed for wrapping cables. In that youtube video I linked above it looks like he has a strip like that on his cable. They are nice because they have slot on the end that you loop the strip through to stay attached to the cable. They are cheap enough to put one on every cable without pain to the wallet.
#12
Quote by 667
I fold the cable end to end, then fold again, and again if it's long enough... then I tie a big knot in the middle. Keeps it tidy and compact.

This way you just un-knot it, and throw one end to uncoil it without any tangles.



<wall of text>

I'm not quite sure how to react to this picture! As someone who has seen the damage caused by people not correctly coiling cables first hand, I can tell you that that is a one way ticket to having busted cables. Same with the "over the elbow" method.

This website is one of the best for showing how its done:
http://allanswalk.blogspot.com/2008/12/proper-cable-coiling.html

I spend a great deal of time fixing cables that suffer general abuse in their daily lives. Most of the problems can be fixed with a bit of solder, but if its coiled like that, it busts the copper strands within the cable, and it cannot be resoldered.

for coiling smaller cables (XLR3 and guitar leads etc) you should use the over/under method shown in the website i posted above. For any larger cables (mains distro stuff, multicore) it should be done in a large firgure of 8.

Smaller stuff should be secured with some sort of tie. Some cables come with velcro straps - use them if you've got them. Failing that, you can buy some straps and fit them yourself, or get a roll of GOOD QUALITY PVC insulation tape. Give each coil a couple of wraps before you put them away to keep them safe/ tangle free.

If you do use the tape to secure them, eventually they'll get covered in tape residue/gunk. Using good quality tape reduces this, and helps stop it happen. However, no matter hwo good your tape, you'll still need to clean them at some point. WD40 is good, but dont use it too often, or you will damage the cable sleeve. There are special products that are for removing tape residue (Goo Gone springs to mind) but they will also damage your cables eventually. Just beware that it can happen if you do it too often.

Good connectors (I'm thinking neutrix or switchcraft here) and good cable (van damme etc) will last longer than cheap cables, and be easier to maintain since you can open the connector up to resolder as required.

Edit: Transport: The pro's use cable trunks for a reason, and its not to look cool with a truck full of flight cases! If your dealing with lots of cabling, I recommend getting something like a plastic box to store/transport them in. Gives something to protect them a bit.

Also, something I've seen many times. Be careful where you are putting things down around cables. Dont slam down a chair, or an amp in top of a cable. You might not see the damage, but odds are on that you've caused some samage to that cable. Its something that people dont always think about. And don't even think about rolling your 412 cab over a cable!

</wall of text>
Quote by Dave_Mc
how do those marshall handles compare tonewise to, say, mesa handles?

Owns a Blackheart Little Giant...
Last edited by AndyPandy at Mar 17, 2009,
#13
Quote by AndyPandy
<wall of text>

I'm not quite sure how to react to this picture!



Nonsense.
First off, obviously that's not an instrument cable - but it is way more delicate than one (it's a wire that goes to an brain oxygen monitoring probe). I assure you,, it's, way, way more delicate than an instrument cable. This is how the developers of this cable store long runs of it.

Second of all, there is absolutely nothing wrong with this method for instrument cable (or the medical device cable). The knot is wound in such a way that the bends that make up the knot can never achieve the sharp bends that occur randomly and naturally when the cable is in use. Try it and see.
#14
Quote by 667

This is how the developers of this cable store long runs of it.


My post was based on years of practical experience and is a view shared by numerous industry professionals. Whats yours based on? Care to post a link to something to show me?

I'm willing to be proved wrong here, but would like to see where they say that.
Quote by Dave_Mc
how do those marshall handles compare tonewise to, say, mesa handles?

Owns a Blackheart Little Giant...
#15
Quote by AndyPandy
My post was based on years of practical experience and is a view shared by numerous industry professionals. Whats yours based on? Care to post a link to something to show me?

I'm willing to be proved wrong here, but would like to see where they say that.


What are you talking about? A link to what? To show it's benefits?
Show me a link that says it's detrimental.
Just try it. It'll be blatantly obvious that it'll do no harm.
#16
How that particular kind of cable is stored according to manufacturer recommendations isn't really relevant to this forum. Therein lies the problem.
#17
Quote by fly135
How that particular kind of cable is stored according to manufacturer recommendations isn't really relevant to this forum. Therein lies the problem.


Haha. Ok.
#18
Whats the elbow method?? Is it wrapping the cable around your elbow, because i tried that, and the cable wouldn't come off my elbow.
#20
Quote by Lefty Guitarist
Whats the elbow method?? Is it wrapping the cable around your elbow, because i tried that, and the cable wouldn't come off my elbow.


You need to dislocate your shoulder.


NO DONT!

I was kidding. KIDDING!
#21
The elbow method breaks cables over time. Trust me, I've seen it happen to tons of XLR cables. It slowly damages the metal wire inside the cable until it snaps from being too fragile and bent. That picture is also a very bad way of folding it. A cable should never be folded or bent to such high degrees, but rather gently looped .

╠═══════╬═══════╣

THE SINE WAVE SURFER σƒ τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ

╠═══════╬═══════╣


[quote="'[BurnTheDusk"]']Boss pedals may be built like tanks but I would rather buy a cardboard box that is on my side than pay for a tank that is working against me.
#22
Quote by AndyPandy
Same with the "over the elbow" method.

This website is one of the best for showing how its done:
http://allanswalk.blogspot.com/2008/12/proper-cable-coiling.html



yeah, when i did the "elbow" method i did it very loosely indeed, and then tied it with a cable tie.

nice link, btw

Quote by Lefty Guitarist
Whats the elbow method?? Is it wrapping the cable around your elbow, because i tried that, and the cable wouldn't come off my elbow.


do it a lot more loosely.

but yeah, that over/under thing sounds like a good idea.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Mar 18, 2009,
#23
Quote by 667
I fold the cable end to end, then fold again, and again if it's long enough... then I tie a big knot in the middle. Keeps it tidy and compact.

This way you just un-knot it, and throw one end to uncoil it without any tangles.

*pic*

I do exactly the same but I can imagine that it's not that good for your cables