#1
finally have decided to learn this beautiful tune which unfortunately has become so cliche lol

my question is about the melody line (the part played mostly on the e and b strings, that starts out as a counterpoint to the bassline). is the melody line played using rest or free stroke? it seems like either would sound good, as long as you alternate the "m" and "i" fingers
#2
I recommend you to do rest strokes (also called appajando) for the upper strings.
This way, the bassline won't drown the melody
#3
I'd recommend the opposite, i.e. free stroke.
It's not even possible to correctly render the entire piece with the consistent use of rest stroke for upper voice, but ultimately it is up to your own personal judgment.
#4
Quote by R.Christie
I'd recommend the opposite, i.e. free stroke.
It's not even possible to correctly render the entire piece with the consistent use of rest stroke for upper voice, but ultimately it is up to your own personal judgment.

+1
is there anybody in there?
#5
Free strokes. Slow practice will account for a correct compensation of the bass/melody. Once you become accustomed to finding the melody lines in pieces you won't have to think about this.


And use "a" as well.
#6
Quote by Confusius
Free strokes. Slow practice will account for a correct compensation of the bass/melody. Once you become accustomed to finding the melody lines in pieces you won't have to think about this.


And use "a" as well.

my school book (written by George Svoboda, a professional player here in san diego), notates it as alternating between "i" and "m", so i think ill stick with that
#8
Eh, I didn't mean that to sound like a requirement. It's not a requirement that you use "a", but it's a possibility you might want to investigate. It's been a long time since I've lpayed the piece but I'm fairly sure there are places where using a as opposed to i or m can be very motion efficient.
#9
Quote by Confusius
Eh, I didn't mean that to sound like a requirement. It's not a requirement that you use "a", but it's a possibility you might want to investigate. It's been a long time since I've lpayed the piece but I'm fairly sure there are places where using a as opposed to i or m can be very motion efficient.

i guess maybe. but in reality, its not the hardest piece in the world, i dont know if any parts would really need "a"finger
#10
Difficulty shouldn't be a factor when considering economy of motion. I'm not saying it needs an a finger, I'm just saying it's a possibility that should be investigated and possibly exploited.
#12
I realise what you meant Confusius, .
The use of a" is again down to personal preference. Some players would use it almost systematically to avoid cross fingerings when a line jumps across 2 or more strings. (e.g. jumping from 3rd (or4th) string to first then to 2nd in following manner: m on 3rd then i on 1st followed by m on 2nd etc. Such a cross fingering is avoided by playing the second note with "a" to avoid necessity of reaching with index to the first string).
Personally I eschew such an approach as it introduces the ring finger in a random non musical manner, one that is based merely upon convenience, prefering the consistency resulting from continuous i,m,i,m. These are fine points that all trained players approach with slightly different philosophies.
edited for spelling
Last edited by R.Christie at Mar 19, 2009,