#1
Hello viewer. I'm having trouble using diminished chords/scales, I think. I'm pretty sure the chord consists of the flat 3rd and flat 5th and the root note. How exactly should the diminished scale look? 3 half steps between every note?
When playing diminished chords in a progression, what is a good chord shape to use if the root is on the low e string, or on the A string? Usually I have a downwards diagonal looking shape, but the chord doesn't sound too good at all, atleast to me, despite that fact that I enjoy dark sounding pieces with different minor patterns. The diminished usually just sounds out of place to me.

Oh, and why doesnt it appear to be common practice that when a powerchord is played where the diminished chord would be in a piece, the 5th is not flat? It is just a regular shape. Even though the diminished shape doesn't really fit in to my ears either in that scenario.
Last edited by Watterboy at Mar 17, 2009,
#2
well it dim cos it doesnt fit well with anything its a root minor 3rd then a min 3rd on the 1st minor 3rd eg E G Bb n 2 make a dim 7th add another min 3rd E G Bb Db n move it round in the same shape,
#3
Well I don't know about diminished scales, but the major scale has a diminished chord on the 7th degree, (in C Major, a B chord is diminished).
Fear the Evil Chainsaw Wielding Penguin...
#4
The diminished triad consists of a root , minor third, and diminished fifth. There are two types of Dim 7 chords, half and full diminished. The half diminished 7 chord is a diminished triad with a minor seventh ex E G Bb D, The full diminished 7 is a diminished triad with a diminished seventh E G Bb Db. I used diminished chords usually in a minor key to pull to the tonic or when switching to the dominant and then to the tonic. It might look like..... Em D#dim7 B7 Em, or something like that. The full diminished chord is usually found in a minor key built off the raised seventh degree.
#5
Some of the info in this thread is right on, some not so much.

A diminished 7 chord is usually voiced 1 b3 b5 7. Technically, diminished chords can be used over any Dominant chord. The 7th chord of the major scale is diminished, and thus, so is the 2nd chord of the minor scale. There are many advanced applications, but for now, just use your ears.

The diminished scale is the tricky part because there are two of them.

The first is as follows

1 2 b3 4 b4 #5 6 7

The second is

1 b2 b3 3 #4 5 6 b7

(please correct me if Im wrong, I wrote them in hast)

As you can see, the scale is octatonic (8 notes), and the pattern is whole/half/whole/half etc, or half/whole/half/whole etc depending which your playing out of

You can use either or depending on what you like. The second is more popular because it has more colorful tones
#6
Quote by Watterboy
Oh, and why doesnt it appear to be common practice that when a powerchord is played where the diminished chord would be in a piece, the 5th is not flat? It is just a regular shape. Even though the diminished shape doesn't really fit in to my ears either in that scenario.


This is because a powerchord uses the fifth to make the note sound thicker and stronger, and isn't really being used a harmony. Its just reinforcing the root, and thus a natural fifth works alot better than the diminished fifth, which would sound dissonant, and wouldn't make it just sound like a single note with more power.
#7
Quote by Watterboy
Oh, and why doesnt it appear to be common practice that when a powerchord is played where the diminished chord would be in a piece, the 5th is not flat? It is just a regular shape. Even though the diminished shape doesn't really fit in to my ears either in that scenario.

The overtones of a note and a tritone above it would clash and sound really ugly. It's generally not a chord you would want to sit on but if you want to make a strong resolution to the tonic, a diminished leading tone chord would work well.

EDIT:
A perfect 5th is one of the most present overtones in any given note, playing a tritone would actually mean that at several places in the sound, there's 2 notes that are exactly 1 semitone apart and, well, play the 4th fret of your A string and the open D string and you will understand why 2 notes a semitone apart played together should be used sparingly.
Last edited by pwrmax at Mar 17, 2009,
#8
Diminished chords are used MAINLY for one purpose: To build tension. To give the peice of music that "unstable feel." Use them right before returning to the tonic chord of that peice. Also the chords usually sound better in first inversion (the third is played first, then the fifth, then the root)
#9
Play a CMaj 7 === x35453
then a C#dim === x4535x (make a C7 chord and move the root to C#)
then Dm === x 5353x
and G7 === 353433

That progression will give you a feel for what the chord does.

And, more often than a scale, you might consider an arpeggio - start on C# and play a series of minor 3rd's.
Last edited by revtfunk at Mar 18, 2009,