#2
That it doesn't refer to functional or diatonic music.
That the notes it's composed of are not represented by degrees that relate to a certain root.

There's no Dominant, or Subdominant for instance, and non of their functions (no III, VI, II, VII, etc)....
You don't have a V-I progression for instance, because the tension would be represented by a dominant and the resolution by a tonic...

I guess you can call it pandiatonic, or maybe atonal, but I don't know the distinctions that well..


AS for examples, I don't know, maybe some chromatic progression...
#3
It does not mean it is bad. The connotations speak that way, but they speak lies.
#4
Tonal harmony uses the creation and resolution of dissonance in order to suggest a tonal center as well as link aspects of the musical structure together. The harmony is thus "functional". Non-functional harmony, such as modal harmony, does not rely on the creation and resolution of dissonance and, in the case of modal harmony specifically, really only uses it to outline the intervals of the mode.
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#5
non functioning harmony refers to harmony of which the tonal center isn't verified by a perfect cadence.
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#6
Quote by Archeo Avis
Tonal harmony uses the creation and resolution of dissonance in order to suggest a tonal center as well as link aspects of the musical structure together. The harmony is thus "functional". Non-functional harmony, such as modal harmony, does not rely on the creation and resolution of dissonance and, in the case of modal harmony specifically, really only uses it to outline the intervals of the mode.


Are their tones still characterized by degrees or not?

I didn't quite know if degrees are specifically of diatonicality, or just a common notation and nothing to do with function (and functions deriving from it)...
#7
Quote by gonzaw
Are their tones still characterized by degrees or not?

I didn't quite know if degrees are specifically of diatonicality, or just a common notation and nothing to do with function (and functions deriving from it)...



Functional means functional in how the harmonic movement indicates.

using leading tones or a progression that resolves back to the tonic chord; for instance a cadence V - I is functional.

How do you mean degrees?

Do you mean accidentals?

If so that's just for notation, and you could actually write music without the key signature, and then it just applies as if it's C Major in notation form.

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#8
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Functional means functional in how the harmonic movement indicates.

using leading tones or a progression that resolves back to the tonic chord; for instance a cadence V - I is functional.

How do you mean degrees?

Do you mean accidentals?

If so that's just for notation, and you could actually write music without the key signature, and then it just applies as if it's C Major in notation form.


I mean degrees as in I, II, and stuff...
I've only seen them relate to tonal music, which is functional, so I don't know if they are used in non-functional ones and are independant of functionality or not...
Maybe degrees are just a way of notating and then functionality uses them as a function of a tonic and stuff, or maybe they are just a byproduct of functionality...