#1
Greetings, UG'ers. Me and my friend recently came to an interesting question. What happens to your technical playing ability, if you lose your memory? We assumed that the motoric skills and all the playing mechanincs should remain and that you would only need to reintroduce the concepts of harmony, melody, composition, etc. So, what do other, more advanced, musicians think about this?
#2
Depends what you mean by lose your memory, there's different types of memory, in different plarts of the brain.
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#3
The technical aspect of guitar is just muscle memory....so i guess that you would still have the ability to play guitar, but you wouldn't have an understanding of how if that makes sense.
#4
Muscle memory is still a part of the brain, it's subconscious. So I guess it would depend on the kind of brain damage.
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#7
A good friend of mine in Colorado went into a coma about 2 1/2 years ago, before I knew him. I met him about a 1 1/2 years ago, as an incredible guitar player. Fairly recently I asked about what I had heard; he explained to me that after his accident he lost all knowledge of everything, and obviously the knowledge/skill of playing guitar. He lost everything except his ear. It was strange because as a few months passed he'd start remembering things; he would remember that he "used to be really good at guitar" and realize that he wasn't at the time because of what happened. He's a bit slow since he had to relearn how to talk - but words came back to him as he went.

As I said, he was an incredibly talented guy when I met him - and his ear is marvelous. Quick recovery I guess.
#8
Quote by .QOTSA.
Depends what you mean by lose your memory, there's different types of memory, in different plarts of the brain.

plarts?
ya i know ya meant parts but i have nothing to do.
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#10
There's a great jazz guitarist named Pat Martino. A few years ago he had a brain aneurysm, which basically erased his ability to play. He then re-taught himself how to play.
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#11
Procedural memory is generally unaffected by the kind of memory loss you're describing. You're dealing with entirely different neurological systems, with procedural memory having huge contributions from subcortical systems.

Biological psychology is my major.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by Archeo Avis
Procedural memory is generally unaffected by the kind of memory loss you're describing. You're dealing with entirely different neurological systems, with procedural memory having huge contributions from subcortical systems.

Biological psychology is my major.


so? we will not lose our ability to play?? or??
i think playing guitar is the same as walking. you`ll not forget to walk right?
#13
Quote by electric_worm7
so? we will not lose our ability to play?? or??
i think playing guitar is the same as walking. you`ll not forget to walk right?


The simple answer is "it depends". With the kind of amnesia the TS is talking about -- the "woke up and can't remember my name" kind -- you would generally expect to see procedural memory intact. Procedural memory can be impaired, but even then it can be complicated (for instance, there are different neurological mechanisms involved in well learned sequences of movement that rely on sensory input and conscious correction than in those that are largely driven by "autopilot"). You can forget how to play, and you can forget how to walk, but both of those memory systems rely on contributions from structures largely distinct from those involved in, say, declarative memory (even though they may overlap in some areas).
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.