#1
I've been playing electric and steel-string acoustic guitar for around 3-4 years and I want to get into classical guitar. I've taken lessons nearly that whole time, but stopped a month or so ago. If I just got a book like this one would it teach me everything I need to know?
http://www.amazon.com/Solo-Guitar-Playing-Book-Classical/dp/0825694000

And what's a good classical guitar for around 300 dollars?
Quote by Spitz13
**** you, i live in uruguay.
#2
I have the same exact book and I can tell you, its no easy task to learn yourself. If you have past experience reading music, then you should be able to understand most of this book. The problem lies in the tecniques used for classical. As a player of both steel-stringed guitar and classicals, the handpositions and movements are almost night and day compared to each other. So in a nutshell, yes you can learn most of what you need to know with this book, but it'll take some work to get used to the different handpositions.

Also, make sure you have the basics down first. If you learn the fundementals wrong right out of the gate it'll be a bear to correct them later down the road.

oh and it doesnt really matter which guitar you get. they all sound and play pretty much the same to new people so just find your personal favorite and go with it. if you insist on some examples, here are a few that I found for you:

http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Rodriguez-Caballero-11-Cedar-Top-Classical-Guitar?sku=514319

http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Alvarez-Artist-Series-AC60S-Classical-Acoustic-Guitar?sku=518733

http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Yamaha-CG131S-Spruce-Top-Classical-Guitar?sku=512442 (this is mine!)
Last edited by guitarmax42 at Mar 18, 2009,
#3
If you wanna learn classical, you gotta get a teacher, or at least some one to smack your hand with a ruler and go "NO THATS WRONG, your hand is supposed to be like this"

Its all about position and technique, which is nigh impossible to learn on your own IMO

You also gotta learn to read music, it makes everything much easier. Plus if there's one thing that makes people look down on guitarists as musicians, its that the vast majority cant read music, only tab.
#4
Oh wow, I purchased the same exact book when I started learning acoustic guitar (random purchased actually). It turned out to be more of a classical book rather than teaching acoustic. To my dismay, I do have a question for guitarmax42 ( I do apologize for hi-jacking the thread), from your post it seems that the techniques taught in this book is different from actual acoustic techniques (I only play on acoustic steeled strings), should I be worry and switch to a different book that teaches mainly acoustic, I have no interest in classical guitar.
#5
I can already read music pretty well. Not well enough to really sightread something fast or with two parts (like classical), but enough to know where the notes are.
Quote by Spitz13
**** you, i live in uruguay.
#6
the book won't teach you everything you need to know, it might get you started down the classical guitar path....a journey I've been on for years, it doesn't seem to end..LOL

A good teacher can get things rolling faster, it can be done on your own if your a good self-learner

good luck!
#8
Quote by vang0341
Oh wow, I purchased the same exact book when I started learning acoustic guitar (random purchased actually). It turned out to be more of a classical book rather than teaching acoustic. To my dismay, I do have a question for guitarmax42 ( I do apologize for hi-jacking the thread), from your post it seems that the techniques taught in this book is different from actual acoustic techniques (I only play on acoustic steeled strings), should I be worry and switch to a different book that teaches mainly acoustic, I have no interest in classical guitar.


mostly, yes, but it depends on which style of acoustic you want to play. The songs in this book were written specifically for classical guitar, which means that its a little awkward to play them on steel-stringed acoustics. Classical guitars have bigger necks, which makes is difficult to play the same techniques on the thinner-necked acoustic guitars. I use my classical training to play songs like Dust In The Wind, but thats about all I have used it for. So, in a nut shell, unless you really want to pursue classical guitar, you should get another book that focuses just on steel-stringed acoustic techniques.

Here's one for you to look at: http://books.google.com/books?id=b0QJAAAACAAJ&dq=acoustic+guitar+lessons&client=firefox-a
Last edited by guitarmax42 at Mar 21, 2009,