#1
How do you go about it? I can't seem to write songs that i'm satisfied with that are simple and sound good. And while i'm at it, how do you write a melody and put stuff to it? I can't seem to do either.
#2
Mess around with songs you already play. Change the rythm, a few notes, the timing for the notes...kind of just make it your own, that usually helps me think of something.

I can't remember what I was playing but this came to my head:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NXZbgWXyLgM

I also have 3 versions of that 'climb and fall' I do near the beginning, just from messing around with the rythm and a note or two.

Basically, just play around with things. Apply your theory a little bit, listen to your ear.

I have a D accidental (sounds accidental, because it ONLY SOUNDS GOOD in 1-2 parts of the song, ONE TIME...) and I haven't found the scale yet... but....

It's a very very simple intro, and I've been told its good. (The biggest thing I've noticed is that I DESPISE my own stuff, but everyone I play it to says "omg that sounds amazing"

So even if you hate it, others may love it which is always a good thing, and sometimes makes the song grow on ya.

Then theres songs you love that the people hate...

Depends...

Do you want to songs you can sell, or songs you like. XD




Please add me if as a friend I helped! (I like to think I'm a friendly person)
Last edited by Invokke_Havokk at Mar 19, 2009,
#3
start at a basic riff, use it for both the intro and the chorus, or the intro and the verse, and do so with a basic time signature at a moderate tempo
Quote by AA00P
Listen to the man, he's Jewish.
#4
http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/demonofthenight/

Look in his blogs, some great stuff about melodies.

And melodies can be a simple line hummed and building upon that.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
It's like you read my mind!

I got meself a self-approving sig. Kick. Ass.
#5
What I do is start with a chord progression, just play around until you get something you like. Then start humming or singing a melody over the chords and create a structured line. Then just keep refining, add lyrics, and never stop looking for innovative things to add.
This is my sig
#6
Thanks everybody.. i'm trying to start from scratch on my songwriting, and I need need help, so everything ya'll are giving me is helping.
Imma check out that link Silver thanks :]
#7
D A G the beginnings for all great songwriters.

Just play around with different progressions in different rhythms, find something that sounds a bit cool and develop it from there.
#8
Quote by cuscus97
D A G the beginnings for all great songwriters.

Just play around with different progressions in different rhythms, find something that sounds a bit cool and develop it from there.


I learned GM CM DM and F#m DM AM EM first.

In fact, I don't think I've ever played D A G.. *just did* ehhk... sounds bad to me.

Then again, I prefer my F#m...sounds cleaner in my ears. can't explain it




Please add me if as a friend I helped! (I like to think I'm a friendly person)
#9
I write TONS and TONS of lyrics...than, when we come up with a good riff/chord progression we look at what it's suitable for.
#10
Start with G D A/Am E/C and play around with those for good chord proggressions. That's the basic roots for almost every progression.
#11
Most of the time I just mess around with basic chord progressions and add little bits in chords, making the suspended or adding notes. A lot of my 'simple' progressions are based around D and G chords.
Rockin' the Gibson SG Standard Cherry!
#12
Try this:
- Improvise over a chord progression and record it.
- Cut out sections you don't like.
- Compile all your ideas together.
- Polish it up then your done.

But there are other methods out there of writing melodies.

Goodluck
#13
The best songs are actually quite simple. Just a simple melody sung with nice lyrics over a simple progression strummed on an acoustic guitar.

For a chord progression, I recommend keeping it simple and keeping it appropriate for the melody. I see alot of guys writing these fancy progressions that would be almost impossible to write a melody for.
It's best to keep regular progressions (think your average I - IV - V sort of thing) and use cadences.

For keeping a melody appropriate to a progression you should have all stressed beats (the first note of every measure) as chord tones. It's also best if all nonchord tones either move or be moved from one or two semitones, so say if A is our non chord tone, it's best if the note before or after it is either a B, Bb, G or G#. This sometimes means using embellishments or adding notes or moving notes or removing notes, which is fine. Your initial idea will still be apparent.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.