#1
Not that I'm 100% after that goal at only 7months of practicing... but I was curious about something.

When you reach the point where you can 'shred' - is it on a per lick basis?

In other words - if you can 'shred' up and down the Am pentatonic scale at 5th fret... would you then have to 'start over/slow' if you wanted to play that same scale starting in a diff position, such as the 7th fret?

Or once you have enough control to 'shred' at all, you can easily incorporate other licks as well without having to start the metronome at 60 again... ?

Hope that makes sense...
#2
usually, its on a technique basis. once u get sweeping down, all sweep licks become easier, same for legato, alternate picking, string skipping, etc. transposing (same intervals/fingerings played in a different key/position) is never and issue, as the motion is more of a challenge than the notes. that make sense?
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#3
You're asking if a shredding guitarist can mesh scales together without slowing down to re-position?

If so, the answer is yes. I don't shred, but most people who do don't slow down - that's why it's called shred. You use things like trills and legato to pull the scales together into something cohesive.
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#4
You don't get better at scales and keys. You can memorize more, but you can't get better at them. You only get better at techniques, and where you are on the fretboard and what scale you're using is a technique.
#5
I found that, above all else it was just something that came to me over time with practice daily, and love for what I do. With a little determination.


But you have to remember too, more important than any scales and sweeping is the amount of heart you put into a lick. Your guitar is in tune, intonated, and then the most important tuning of the guitar decides its final tone. That's where your guitar comes in tune with the energy you put out (that's what made angus young a bad ass).


You can play any lick faster than everyone else - but that doesn't mean your playing it better.

And just like that, because you put ten tons of music theory into your solo doesn't mean it sounds better than my solo which came entirely from the heart. Mick Mars has publicly said he doesn't use theory intentionally, that all of his stuff comes from his heart.


It's something that you just get a feel for over time. Theory should only be there to help you.
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#6
Quote by idahoimmortal

And just like that, because you put ten tons of music theory into your solo doesn't mean it sounds better than my solo which came entirely from the heart. Mick Mars has publicly said he doesn't use theory intentionally, that all of his stuff comes from his heart.

It's something that you just get a feel for over time. Theory should only be there to help you.


Mick Mars, whether intentional or not, favours the blues scale, the aeolian mode and spanish phrygian.

Additionally he plays a lot of the same solos live that he does in the studio, which suggests that he has spent time composing these parts specifically for each song, so more pre-planned than from the heart.

That's not to say he isn't a great guitarist, but it's not as improvised as you are suggesting. You are right in suggesting that theory is there to help you though - it informs you as to what is appropriate to play in each song, whilst if you press random notes "from the heart", well, it's not going to be as awesome as you think.
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#7
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Not that I'm 100% after that goal at only 7months of practicing... but I was curious about something.

When you reach the point where you can 'shred' - is it on a per lick basis?

In other words - if you can 'shred' up and down the Am pentatonic scale at 5th fret... would you then have to 'start over/slow' if you wanted to play that same scale starting in a diff position, such as the 7th fret?

Or once you have enough control to 'shred' at all, you can easily incorporate other licks as well without having to start the metronome at 60 again... ?

Hope that makes sense...

Forget shredding.

Just concentrate on learning to play - if you practice dilligently and in the right way then you'll eventually be able to "shred".

All the best guitarists did that, they didn't sit down and say to themselves "right, today I am going to learn to shred". They just focussed on doing everything as well as they could - they didn't worry about how good they would or wouldn't get, they simply worried about improving and developing from whatever point they were at at any given time. Attention to detail is what makes you good, making sure that you know everything you think you know as well as you possibly can before worrying about moving on.

Also, shredding isn't just about how fast you can move your fingers, it's about how fast you can think. If you're going to be playing at speed you need to understand the instrument well enough that you'll know what every note is going to sound like in a millisecond. If you can't do that then there's no point worrying about developing that kind of speed yet, like Paul Gilbert says...you have to learn to steer before you start hitting the gas.
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#8
You set yourself a goal, practice the licks and phrases you want to learn as cleanly as possible by setting the metronome to 20bpm lower than you can play it cleanly to make sure you're not rushing. Keep doing that, increasing speed whenever you're completely comfortable with it, then once you've gotten that lick down you can move to another. After that, you move onto another, once you've got lots of licks down, start experimenting with scale runs and see which run fits which lick or you can string licks together.

It's all down to practice, you don't just wake up one day and become a shredder, you just need to dedicate your time to perfecting those licks, the same way you would if you were learning a solo only shred requires much more discipline.

Don't avoid learning how to improvise and make it sound good either, way too many people too that and they've earnt shred the title of "Mindless crap"

If you can separate yourself from the rest of the less musical musicians, you've got something going.