#1
I was watching Metal: A Headbanger's Journey a while ago, and I was interested in Dee Snider's senate committee hearing speech. From what I heard of it (about 30 seconds worth), the speech looked epic. I've been searching on google and youtube, but I've only been finding references to the documentary cut-outs.

Does anybody have a transcript of the speech or a video of him reading it in it's entirety?
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#2
I would like to know this too.
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#7
Quote by GuitarManiac09
I'd hope he was against it, right?


Yeah. Who would've thought an 80's rocker could speak better than most proffesional speakers/politicians

AND THANKS A HEAP FOR THAT LINK!!!!
Quote by srvguitarrulez
I heard someone say that Fall Out Boy had amazing guitarwork. But, it was a 13 year old girl, so it didn't matter.
#8
He was in Twisted Sister, right?


*hopes he doesn't look like an idiot*

Frank Zappa also spoke out against censorship and was an all-around pimp.
#9
Quote by RU Experienced?
He was in Twisted Sister, right?


*hopes he doesn't look like an idiot*

Frank Zappa also spoke out against censorship and was an all-around pimp.

You do, sorry.
#10
Dee Snider was one of the smartest musicians of that era. I hate his music, but like him a lot.
#11
Quote by RU Experienced?
He was in Twisted Sister, right?


*hopes he doesn't look like an idiot*

Frank Zappa also spoke out against censorship and was an all-around pimp.


Yeah he still sings for TS hes actually a smart guy if you watch the video. They thought the same thing that they were gonna bring him in and he was gonna be a dumb rocker guy but he actually kicked the commitees ass with his speech.
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#12
just wanna say that documentary is absolutely phenomenal and was made by one of my Canuck Brethren :P
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#13
Quote by Mootallica
Yeah. Who would've thought an 80's rocker could speak better than most proffesional speakers/politicians

AND THANKS A HEAP FOR THAT LINK!!!!


why would you think an 80s rocker COULDNT speak better than a politician
#15
Quote by Taren
just wanna say that documentary is absolutely phenomenal and was made by one of my Canuck Brethren :P


Agreed, Metal A Headbangers Journey was great as well I almost got my sociology teacher to show it to the class in high school.
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#16
Quote by Lethal Dosage
Yeah he still sings for TS hes actually a smart guy if you watch the video. They thought the same thing that they were gonna bring him in and he was gonna be a dumb rocker guy but he actually kicked the commitees ass with his speech.

Good, it's amazing how many people are pro-censorship it's actually quite appalling.
#17
Quote by RU Experienced?
Good, it's amazing how many people are pro-censorship it's actually quite appalling.


Yeah the accusations were so stupid. They said Under The Blade was about masochism (?) when its actually about Dee getting a throat operation. But songs like WASP's F*ck Like A Beast didnt help metals side a whole lot (although WASP is amazing they are in my top 10 for my favorite bands).
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#18
Quote by Agent_darkbooty
why would you think an 80s rocker COULDNT speak better than a politician


I never stated "I".

I was referring to the fact that all of the committee board at the hearing expected him to be a typical "rocker stereotype"; unintelligent, smart-assed, you know, drug addict, sex addict, preaching of death, no respect for moral fibre.
Quote by srvguitarrulez
I heard someone say that Fall Out Boy had amazing guitarwork. But, it was a 13 year old girl, so it didn't matter.
#19
Dee is a smart man. I just read about 15 pages of that.
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#20
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why would you think an 80s rocker COULDNT speak better than a politician


Vince Neil and Bret Michaels. Enough said.
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#21
Really, that's the only thing Dee Snider did worth talking about.

Twisted Sister is just terrible, IMO.


But, yeah, his speech was really good, IMO. Hit all the right points. Zappa's was better, though.
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#23
I didn't say you couldn't.
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#24
Dee Snider just earned a hell of a lot of respect from me.
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#25
I'm not a fan of the band, myself, but the speech was great. Yay for Snider.
#26
You know who else was awesome in those senate hearing? John ****ing Denver!

Yea, that guy was against censorship.
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#27
It's one thing to read the transcript, it's another to actually hear or watch him read it.

I've only seen what was on Metal: A Headbangers Journey, which has a short interview with Snider as well.

For those that haven't seen the interview, I'll post the youtube link here

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0V-wpSCM9Jk
Quote by srvguitarrulez
I heard someone say that Fall Out Boy had amazing guitarwork. But, it was a 13 year old girl, so it didn't matter.
#28
So, now I think we should ask, what do the rest of us as musicians think of censorship?

I figure most of us are against it, as it's a simple decision of if you don't like the message don't listen to it. But what about our future off-spring? Do you think you need to watch what they listen to? Or do you think it's okay for them to listen to whatever they want?

Personally, I don't care what my children will eventually listen to, I mean yea, music and lyrics has shaped me into the person I am, but it comes with some sense. And the teaching of that doesn't come from a school, a song, or a book, it comes from home. So you have do tell them what everything means, and let them understand that it's a song, it's someone elses view. They can take it if they want, it doesn't matter as long as they understand.

And I'm pretty sure that any human being can understand that lyrics glorifying violence, sexism, and all that other bad ****, can discern what crap it may be.

I don't need a label to tell me what lyrics are bad and what are not.
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#29
If I have kids, I'll let them listen to what they want, but if I hear them listening to something a bit... messed up, I'll ask them about it. Whether they believe the lyrics, if they know what it means, and how much of it they listen to.
#30
Quote by CupOfFail
If I have kids, I'll let them listen to what they want, but if I hear them listening to something a bit... messed up, I'll ask them about it. Whether they believe the lyrics, if they know what it means, and how much of it they listen to.

That's all you have to do.

Let them listen to it, because it's hypocritical to say "oh, let me say what I want to say in my lyrics, but no your's because I find them offensive"
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#31
Quote by DoTheEvolution
So, now I think we should ask, what do the rest of us as musicians think of censorship?

I figure most of us are against it, as it's a simple decision of if you don't like the message don't listen to it. But what about our future off-spring? Do you think you need to watch what they listen to? Or do you think it's okay for them to listen to whatever they want?

Personally, I don't care what my children will eventually listen to, I mean yea, music and lyrics has shaped me into the person I am, but it comes with some sense. And the teaching of that doesn't come from a school, a song, or a book, it comes from home. So you have do tell them what everything means, and let them understand that it's a song, it's someone elses view. They can take it if they want, it doesn't matter as long as they understand.

And I'm pretty sure that any human being can understand that lyrics glorifying violence, sexism, and all that other bad ****, can discern what crap it may be.

I don't need a label to tell me what lyrics are bad and what are not.


I dont think the arts should be censored. The artist should be free to express themselves without having to worry about whether or not Walmart is gonna sell their cd if they use certain words or themes. Provided my children can see the difference between the real world and what a song says Im not worried about what they listen to really. Ive found my own path as far as the music I listen to goes, I love it because I relate to it but also because I was allowed the freedom to find it on my own.
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#32
I know that if I ever become a big rock star or whatever, that I will never allow Wal-Mart to sell my records, I just won't give it to them. I think what they do is the worst thing you can do to music and the consumer (us) of said music. If I buy an album, I'm paying for those lyrics, I'm paying to hear what the artist says, no matter what he says. That's what you should get when you spend your money on it, nothing that is edited. If you don't like the lyrics, don't buy the damn record.
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#33
While I started this thread and inadvertently this discussion, I feel it would be fitting to answer, and thanks for bringing up that second discussion, I need to make myself feel smart by possibly appearing foolish haha. That made no sense, but yeah, whatever.


I was one of those that listened to rap when I was young, around 9, 10, 11, whatever, my pre-teen years. I listened to that because it was what was deemed cool, and since it was in the mainstream, people would be like, oh, it's ok, it's only rap, without concentrating on the message that the rap was putting forth. The music then did have more (what would considered to be) explicit content compared to many forms of metal listened to by the youth then (5-8 years ago). At the time, it was seen as the mainstream, and people who listened to rap were never glorified, but they were never criticised as well. This is how I saw at, and at the age of 10, I never could really understand the difference.

When I was in high school, I was forced into a music class, which was under the Year 7 and Year 8 non-elective school curriculum. In these 2 years of my life (ages 12 and 13), I was introduced into the more non-mainstream choices of music. While I wasn't completely oblivious to their existence (some of the household names such as Queen come to mind), I began to wonder why it was never presented into the mainstream, why it's popularity was never really focused on in my earlier years of life. Whether it was because of suppression politically, suppression through the media, or a combination of both combined with the gullibility of parents, the existence of what I now consider to be the true form of music was to me, at the time, non existent.

I began to divulge more into new musical tastes. I began to stray away from the sexually orientated forms of music that rap at the time was based on, and as I began to get older, and more things in life became an interest to me, such as politics and the positive and negative effects, this abstract form of music was catching my eye. The messages that were presented in this music by such artists such as Metallica (the first of these bands that I layed my ears upon), and bands from the same era such as Megadeth and Anthrax was very different to the mainstream messages of sex, drugs and money which had become not only the driving force of the current music industry, but more importantly, had glorified those 3 objects as the only important things in life.

After more research, many other bands, using very similar themes to the mainstream rap that I was talking about, were politically bashed, censored, isolated and ridiculed for the exact same themes which are now deemed acceptable and to an extent expected.

Any other message in music seemed that seemed to oppose what the social norm at the time was, or was just different, was automatically ridiculed, and heavy metal, and any other forms, genres, sub-genre's or elements of metal have therefore been stereotyped, misinterpreted, and therefore have become the scapegoat for many problems in society which the community is either too scared to face, or just don't know how to face it full stop.

It is ironic however that the messages which were ridiculed 20-30 years ago of sex and drugs are now seen as mainstream, and this is where I come to conclude, that to me, censorship is a load of crap. The censorship ideas of 20 years ago due to the new abstract forms of music and the straying ideas of the social norm should not be applied now and therefore should be abandoned.

My children will be allowed to listen to whatever they feel they want to listen to. While I personally will try and get them to listen to the styles of music I enjoy, the styles of music that seemed to appeal to me most, there is always the chance that my children in the future will support a different style of music, and whatever their lyrics glorify, and I will support their decision on that. After all, was I not so much different when I was younger and still experiencing the newer forms of music in my life?

Wow, that turned actually into a pretty smart topic... Hmm......


I need time to think now lol.
Quote by srvguitarrulez
I heard someone say that Fall Out Boy had amazing guitarwork. But, it was a 13 year old girl, so it didn't matter.
#34
I don't see how you can argue for censorship. It is not in our governments power to censor words, ideas, concepts, etc. or the expression of those ideas. To do so is a violation of our first amendment rights.
#35
Quote by Taren
just wanna say that documentary is absolutely phenomenal and was made by one of my Canuck Brethren :P

i'm currently writing a college paper about women in metal and i am proud to say that documentary is one of my sources.
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#36
My respect for Dee Snider just went up about 50 points.

Also, it's just common sense.

Yeah, I'm gonna kinda watch what my kids listen to and watch, but I'm not gonna censor EVERYTHING. If they're listening to something like Tool, who have some moderately fucked up lyrics, I wouldn't mind. I'd just tell them to take some things with a grain of salt, you know?
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#37
Quote by Primus2112
My respect for Dee Snider just went up about 50 points.

Also, it's just common sense.

Yeah, I'm gonna kinda watch what my kids listen to and watch, but I'm not gonna censor EVERYTHING. If they're listening to something like Tool, who have some moderately fucked up lyrics, I wouldn't mind. I'd just tell them to take some things with a grain of salt, you know?

Yea. That's all you have to do.

It seriously shouldn't be up to the government what my children can listen to, iit's up the them. I don't care if they listen to **** about raping goats and ****, I would like to think that anything that I helped create would be smart enough to figure out what is okay and not.
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#38
Cool speech. In light of this, if you haven't seen it, look for Strangeland. That is Dee Snider in another light.

Censorship. Putting labels on things. I don't trust anyone especially when it comes to money. If some company is trying to sell me something I'm going to check the label very carefully. I feel I am a socially responsible consumer so I'm not going to buy anything with say, palm oil in it, because most palm oil comes from malaysia and indonesia and the farmers are cutting down the forest where the orangutans live. This is helping their extinction. http://www.organicconsumers.org/Politics/palmoil100305.cfm That is just one example.
It annoys me that products that are GE free label themselves yet products that do have genetically engineered materials in them don't have to be labeled. We do not know the full extent of how these things will affect us as they are too new. I am not volunteering my bodies to consumer science.
I just don't trust anyone who's trying to get me to give them the little money I have. So that's food etc.

What about music/art? The truth is we don't really know how these things affect us. Did the PMRC? Who knows. Censorship reminds me of the treasures that the Nazi's destroyed and the cultures that the Catholic church extinguished in the crusades, the witch burnings, all the natural wisdom, observations of nature, shamanic wisdom, and natural lore that was wiped out by colonialism.
We are slowly reconstructing the jigsaw puzzle to reestablish these insights. We have been blinded by those in power but we are gradually tearing away the wool from our eyes.
#39
Quote by Lethal Dosage
I dont think the arts should be censored. The artist should be free to express themselves without having to worry about whether or not Walmart is gonna sell their cd if they use certain words or themes. Provided my children can see the difference between the real world and what a song says Im not worried about what they listen to really. Ive found my own path as far as the music I listen to goes, I love it because I relate to it but also because I was allowed the freedom to find it on my own.


It also pisses me off because the very first amendment adresses freedom of speech, press, etc., but people still don't realize this. Shame what kind of country America has turned into.
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#40
Quote by Mootallica
While I started this thread and inadvertently this discussion, I feel it would be fitting to answer, and thanks for bringing up that second discussion, I need to make myself feel smart by possibly appearing foolish haha. That made no sense, but yeah, whatever.


I was one of those that listened to rap when I was young, around 9, 10, 11, whatever, my pre-teen years. I listened to that because it was what was deemed cool, and since it was in the mainstream, people would be like, oh, it's ok, it's only rap, without concentrating on the message that the rap was putting forth. The music then did have more (what would considered to be) explicit content compared to many forms of metal listened to by the youth then (5-8 years ago). At the time, it was seen as the mainstream, and people who listened to rap were never glorified, but they were never criticised as well. This is how I saw at, and at the age of 10, I never could really understand the difference.

When I was in high school, I was forced into a music class, which was under the Year 7 and Year 8 non-elective school curriculum. In these 2 years of my life (ages 12 and 13), I was introduced into the more non-mainstream choices of music. While I wasn't completely oblivious to their existence (some of the household names such as Queen come to mind), I began to wonder why it was never presented into the mainstream, why it's popularity was never really focused on in my earlier years of life. Whether it was because of suppression politically, suppression through the media, or a combination of both combined with the gullibility of parents, the existence of what I now consider to be the true form of music was to me, at the time, non existent.

I began to divulge more into new musical tastes. I began to stray away from the sexually orientated forms of music that rap at the time was based on, and as I began to get older, and more things in life became an interest to me, such as politics and the positive and negative effects, this abstract form of music was catching my eye. The messages that were presented in this music by such artists such as Metallica (the first of these bands that I layed my ears upon), and bands from the same era such as Megadeth and Anthrax was very different to the mainstream messages of sex, drugs and money which had become not only the driving force of the current music industry, but more importantly, had glorified those 3 objects as the only important things in life.

Agreed on the metallica and megadeth etc not being about Sex or drugs, it's more intelligent than those. They're more politically relevant and/or cynical and angry.
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