#1
I am writing an assignment on the influence of Jazz on popular music. I was hoping that you could help teach me about the influence of Jazz on Rock music. Obviously Rock has based on the blues and there is a strong relationship between jazz and blues.

If anyone could blast a bit of knowledge out I would be grateful. Cheers.
#2
In a nutshell:

By the end of the 1960s, jazz and rock started to cover more and more common ground. Rock music gradually got more intricate harmonically and at the same time jazz musicians were getting increasingly interested in the raw sounds of rock and its instruments.
It was only a matter of time before true hybrid forms would appear, but In A Silent Way and Bitches Brew by Miles Davis are usually seen as milestones in this respect. Simultaneously, several rock musicians made highly jazzy music such as Frank Zappa and Soft Machine and very soon, tons of bands appeared that had clear elements of both jazz and rock, most predominantly in jazz fusion but also quite notably in progressive rock. By the early 70s, rock-inspired jazz, jazz-inspired rock and everything in between were fully blossoming all over the world and this blurring of genre boundaries has had a huge impact on further developments.

Use wikipedia or something for more in-depth information.
#4
I think the most significant innovation was the development of modal jazz with "Kind of Blue" by Miles Davis

Compare this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kotK9FNEYU

to this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEC8nqT6Rrk

Giant Steps is a harmonic maze, with many chords, while So What, a model song, has only two. This would have a big impact on rock music, where you would solo over only 1-3 chords rather then 1000000000.

Sorry if this isn't the best explanation.
#6
Quote by aetherspear
^yeah, but Miles Davis really didn't create the vamp.


No, but he did increase its popularity, and many rockers like Duane Allman directly cite itas an influence