#1
Hey guys, I've been self teaching myself how to play Classical guitar for around 3 weeks now, I will be getting a tutor soon.

Do I practice enough? Everyday I practice roughly 30-40mins.

Also can you guys help me find info on my guitar.

It's an ANJO , model no. SC330

It was passed down from my dad, And he owned it for around 10 years
Last edited by AcousticArc at Mar 20, 2009,
#2
Korean made guitar. Thats about all I know.

30-40 minutes a day is decent. I guess my practice routine is wierd. I like to play until it hurts to type, and then I have a ... "drink" ... and keep on going.

If I remember correctly, my dad had an ANJO guitar about 16 years ago when I was 7 years old and my parents got into it and he broke it over his knee and bought a Yamaha. I remember when he played it I fell in love with it, but thats with 7 year ears so I don't know.
#3
i,ve been playing classical for a bit my aadvise to you is at least know your major scales you will save yourself a lot of money
#4
Personally, I don't think 30 to 40 minutes is enough for classical guitar. 2 to 2 1/2 hours should be good enough to get the precision in a song with gradual practice. But then again, thats just me, and you might be a fast learner.
#5
Quote by tehzomg
Personally, I don't think 30 to 40 minutes is enough for classical guitar. 2 to 2 1/2 hours should be good enough to get the precision in a song with gradual practice. But then again, thats just me, and you might be a fast learner.



Uhm, What would you consider fast learner? My fingers start to hurt like crazy at around 30mins. So, that's all I can manage, but sometimes I will practice more during the day if I have time.

I'm still a teenager, so I have lot's of time to learn.
#6
Being a fast learner in my definition is getting the correct fretting when playing any classical song (most effective fretting), along with the correct posture, decent ear training to get a musical sound that is somewhat precise, a general knowing of scales, and techniques (right hand AH, classical/flamenco tremolo, rest stroke, etc) within a 5-7 month time span.

BUT, don't rush it. When practicing classical, it's really important you get that correct sound, even if you have to practice slowly. And as for your hands, give them time and eventually they'll develop callous.

Oh, and grow out some nails.
#7
Is don't think this is normal for a guitar, but when I strum my high E string, the A string starts to vibrate and make a high pitched but quite noise.

If I strum my B string, the Low E string starts vibrating and making a high pitched but quite noise and Vice Versa for both problems stated above


What's wrong with my guitar?


@TehZomg, I heard you don't have to play with nails, but you can also play with flesh, like Francisco Tarrega the founder of Flesh Playing
Last edited by AcousticArc at Mar 21, 2009,
#8
I dont know about that string problem, might be a bridge problem or something... I dunno :p

About the nails, theres a topic around here somewhere about nails and classical guitar.... but my opinion is, grow some nails, it makes everything easier

Playing louder? Easier with nails
Accuracy during tirando/apoyado? Easier with nails.
Rasgeuado? Near impossible to make it sound right without nails
Golpe? Much clearer and easier to do with nails
Etc....

You have to keep in mind that Tarrega DID use nails for most of his life, only using finger-tips when he stopped playing concerts.

Honestly, there is a certain softness and soulfulness when you play with fingertips, but nails give you so much more volume and let you change the timbre of the guitar so easily by allowing you to "dig in" to the strings at a moments notice that I would recommend if you are going to play classical guitar with any seriousness, grow some nails :p
#9
Quote by Sootinior
I dont know about that string problem, might be a bridge problem or something... I dunno :p

About the nails, theres a topic around here somewhere about nails and classical guitar.... but my opinion is, grow some nails, it makes everything easier

Playing louder? Easier with nails
Accuracy during tirando/apoyado? Easier with nails.
Rasgeuado? Near impossible to make it sound right without nails
Golpe? Much clearer and easier to do with nails
Etc....

You have to keep in mind that Tarrega DID use nails for most of his life, only using finger-tips when he stopped playing concerts.

Honestly, there is a certain softness and soulfulness when you play with fingertips, but nails give you so much more volume and let you change the timbre of the guitar so easily by allowing you to "dig in" to the strings at a moments notice that I would recommend if you are going to play classical guitar with any seriousness, grow some nails :p


Lol, I just trimmed my nails a few days ago. Do I need to grow nails on my thumb? Because you strum with the side of your thumb don't you?
#10
Grow out your Thumb (p) Index (i) middle (m) and ring (a) finger nails on your right hand. Filing the nails to the right shape is really an art form in itself and can take months if not years to understand.
30-40 minutes isnt enough in my opinion, I practice 3-6 hours everyday, but for a beginner i would say 1 1/2 to 2 hours a day is just fine.

Make sure to buy some method/scale/technique books. I would recommend:
1. Solo Guitar Playing 1 by Frederick M. Noad
2. 120 Studies for right hand development by Mauro Giuliani (Arpeggio book)
3. Diatonic Major and Minor Scales by Andres Segovia
4. Slur Exercises and Chromatic Octaves by Andres Segovia
5. Twenty Studies for the Guitar by Fernando Sor (Andres Segovia Edition)

Books 1, 2, and 3 are the most important in my opinion
and getting a teacher is probably the best thing you could do, as long as the teacher works with the student and doesnt just teach the way he was taught.
#11
Quote by whocares09
Grow out your Thumb (p) Index (i) middle (m) and ring (a) finger nails on your right hand. Filing the nails to the right shape is really an art form in itself and can take months if not years to understand.
30-40 minutes isnt enough in my opinion, I practice 3-6 hours everyday, but for a beginner i would say 1 1/2 to 2 hours a day is just fine.

Make sure to buy some method/scale/technique books. I would recommend:
1. Solo Guitar Playing 1 by Frederick M. Noad
2. 120 Studies for right hand development by Mauro Giuliani (Arpeggio book)
3. Diatonic Major and Minor Scales by Andres Segovia
4. Slur Exercises and Chromatic Octaves by Andres Segovia
5. Twenty Studies for the Guitar by Fernando Sor (Andres Segovia Edition)

Books 1, 2, and 3 are the most important in my opinion
and getting a teacher is probably the best thing you could do, as long as the teacher works with the student and doesnt just teach the way he was taught.



Stupid question, Why do you need nails on your thumb? Don't you strum with the side of your thumb?
#13
when you play with your fingers, you strike the string with the flesh part of your fingertip which is followed by your fingernail. The nail makes the sound brighter, louder and gives your more tonal capabilities.
The string should hit the left side of your fingernail.
just look up a video of a classical guitarist and watch his picking hand. Pepe Romero has a big thumbnail so he would be a good reference.
#14
Quote by whocares09
when you play with your fingers, you strike the string with the flesh part of your fingertip which is followed by your fingernail. The nail makes the sound brighter, louder and gives your more tonal capabilities.
The string should hit the left side of your fingernail.
just look up a video of a classical guitarist and watch his picking hand. Pepe Romero has a big thumbnail so he would be a good reference.



okay, I understand now
#15
Thread starter, who are you trying to race? Play as long as you enjoy it and when you're through, stop. Regimenting yourself into practicing 3 hours a day will get tiring and boring. Play for the sake of playing, not just to log hours on your guitar. As you learn more, you'll want to play more.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Mar 23, 2009,
#16
Quote by GC Shred Off
Thread starter, who are you trying to race? Play as long as you enjoy it and when you're through, stop. Regimenting yourself into practicing 3 hours a day will get tiring and boring. Play for the sake of playing, not just to log hours on your guitar. As you learn more, you'll want to play more.



All my friends are really good at guitar, more than half of them play. I guess I want to be as good as them.

*plays pokemon theme song*

I want to be the very best.....
Like no one ever was.
#17
Yea, if you are forcing yourself to play then youre not really having fun. I play for 3-6 hours a day because i want to, not because i feel as though i am obligated to do so.

I mentioned 1 1/2 - 2 hours of practice earlier because i feel it is a substantial amount of time to get better at guitar at a reasonable pace. But if you feel it is too much for you, then it is simply too much for you. If its not enough, then practice more.

and one of the most damaging things you could do to yourself is comparing yourself to another guitarist. If i were to compare me to some of the guitarists I know (my teacher for example), I would be a miserable person.
Just play for yourself, its the most rewarding thing you could do.
#18
Thanks for the motivation!

Do you think self teaching if okay? Or should I get a tutor.
#19
Putting time limits on practise is largely pointless. I can achieve more in 20 minutes than some can in two hours. It's how you approach your practise sessions that has the most bearing. Setting goals, focus, knowing what you need to cover etc etc.
So forget the "you must aim for 1 1/2 hours" nonsense.
I recommend novices practise anything over 15mins a day as long as it is REGULAR, DISCIPLINED (ensure each session achieves it's aim) and FOCUSED on GOALS. For this it is best to have a good teacher as a guide.
Last edited by R.Christie at Mar 23, 2009,
#20
Quote by R.Christie
Putting time limits on practise is largely pointless. I can achieve more in 20 minutes than some can in two hours. It's how you approach your practise sessions that has the most bearing. Setting goals, focus, knowing what you need to cover etc etc.
So forget the "you must aim for 1 1/2 hours" nonsense.
I recommend novices practise anything over 15mins a day as long as it is REGULAR, DISCIPLINED (ensure each session achieves it's aim) and FOCUSED on GOALS. For this it is best to have a good teacher as a guide.



What do you suggest I practice in the daily routine?
#21
I practice Scales-major and minor (using the Segovia scale book), Arpeggios/Tremolo(Guiliani book), and Slurs/Chromatic Octaves/Finger independency (Segovia slurs).

Scales are probably the most important "Technique" Practice you could do. they incorporate so much of regular playing and address numerous problems all at once.

R. Christie is completely right in saying regular disciplined practice is far better than numerous hours in unfocused practice.
#22
At this stage (first few months)
LH: concentrate on developing a correct plucking actions from a stable hand position.
RH: Almost exactly the same: correct RH and shoulder/arm wrist positions and stability through security.
Don't be impatient, use this period to understand musical and technical foundations without which you will encounter only frustration.
Your teacher should monitor the rate of material you cover.
#23
Great tips so far but I think you should consider adding a left hand stretching exercise to the daily routine aswell cause there can be a lot of awkward strecthes in classical guitar. There are two great ones in the exercise book Pumping Nylon which also contains things like Giuliani's 120 right hand patterns. If you don't feel like getting this book though, you can check justinguitar.com for a quite decent stretch exercise.

And also you shouldn't only practice exercises. You should really learn some easier pieces and studies. Carcassi's 25 studies is a great place to start for beginners and check out Tárrega for some easier pieces to learn, Lágrima is great for example.

cheers!
is there anybody in there?
#24
I haven't learned those yet, but here's my dailey routines

10 mins- Finger exercises. 1st fret on low E, then 2 fret on Low E, etc,et,c

10-15mins- Practice learned chords, and Learn 1 new chord.

20mins- Practice playing songs
#25
I would say skip the chords, when you play classical music you dont usually think "lets play a C chord here, or lets play a Dsus2 here". Substitute it out with some arpeggios or scales.
#27
Okay I've learned the pentatonic scale, and Major scale.
Do I just practice playing them starting anywhere on my neck now?
#28
It depends on what shape you learned, I never use the pentatonic scale.
What my scales consist of is:
5th String
1. C major scale (shape) starting at C and and work chromatically up the neck to E
2. Eb melodic minor starting at Eb working down to C
3. B melodic minor (3 octave, highest note on guitar is played) down to Bb

6th String
1. E major scale on E
2. F major scale on F
3. B major scale (shape) starting on F# chromatically up to B (highest note is played)
4. A Melodic minor starting on A chromatically down to F
5. E melodic minor scale

I play that entire sequence 16 times at varying tempos (Slow, Fast, Slow, Fast) and with different right hand fingerings (ma, am, mi, im (maybe ia, ai))

it takes me about 70 minutes total.

But to answer your question, take that Major Scale shape, start on a note (probably B on the 5th string) and work your way up chromatically up the neck. and then take it back down.
If its a 6 string shape, do the same only starting on F#
#31
Quote by whocares09
Its cool, the major scale pattern you learned, is it a 5 string pattern or 6 string pattern?



I was taught to play up until the 3rd string..... Errr Crap? I was also told I could start anywhere on the neck, 6th string.
#32
Then just start on the 2nd or 3rd fret of the low E string. play the scale up and down at an easy tempo. then move it up a fret and do the same thing until you get as far up the guitar as the guitar allows (either the highest note on guitar or where the body meets the neck) and then take it down the fret board moving one fret at a time.

Depending on how much time the entire sequence takes you, you should use different fingerings for your right hand.
First go i (index) m (middle) i m. for an entire sequence
and then try i (index) a (ring) i a.
and then m a m a.

start at a moderately slow tempo at first, something you are comfortable with. When i first started doing scales i was picking 8th notes at 60 beats per minute.
after a few days of going that speed, take it up a couple notches. just remember to pace yourself.
#33
Quote by whocares09
Then just start on the 2nd or 3rd fret of the low E string. play the scale up and down at an easy tempo. then move it up a fret and do the same thing until you get as far up the guitar as the guitar allows (either the highest note on guitar or where the body meets the neck) and then take it down the fret board moving one fret at a time.

Depending on how much time the entire sequence takes you, you should use different fingerings for your right hand.
First go i (index) m (middle) i m. for an entire sequence
and then try i (index) a (ring) i a.
and then m a m a.

start at a moderately slow tempo at first, something you are comfortable with. When i first started doing scales i was picking 8th notes at 60 beats per minute.
after a few days of going that speed, take it up a couple notches. just remember to pace yourself.


So the way I was taught is okay? If so I'll start practicing right away
#34
Yep, sounds like it. Just make sure to pace yourself, and if you ever feel pain in your hands/fingers/wrist, to stop for a while. Dont try to push through the pain.
So do you have a teacher?
#35
Quote by whocares09
Yep, sounds like it. Just make sure to pace yourself, and if you ever feel pain in your hands/fingers/wrist, to stop for a while. Dont try to push through the pain.
So do you have a teacher?



Not really, getting a tutor in 2weeks. Dont' know how to judge if a Tutor is good or not.
#36
well, they should know what to do. The best thing you could do right now is get someone to help you, otherwise you will develop bad habits and it takes forever to break them, i learned that the hard way.
#37
Quote by whocares09
Then just start on the 2nd or 3rd fret of the low E string. play the scale up and down at an easy tempo. then move it up a fret and do the same thing until you get as far up the guitar as the guitar allows (either the highest note on guitar or where the body meets the neck) and then take it down the fret board moving one fret at a time.

Depending on how much time the entire sequence takes you, you should use different fingerings for your right hand.
First go i (index) m (middle) i m. for an entire sequence
and then try i (index) a (ring) i a.
and then m a m a.

start at a moderately slow tempo at first, something you are comfortable with. When i first started doing scales i was picking 8th notes at 60 beats per minute.
after a few days of going that speed, take it up a couple notches. just remember to pace yourself.



How do you find out BPM? Count it O___O?
#38
BPM means Beats Per Minute

60 BPM= 1 beat every second
120 BPM= 2 beats every second

those 2 are pretty easy, you just need a clock to figure them out.

but for weirder ones like 76 BPM 45 BPM etc (any number) get a metronome, they are a very useful tool for any musician, although they can be a little pricey sometimes.

Or find an Online metronome.

www.metronomeonline.com has a good one.