#1
Hi,
Am I right in saying that a Gmajor scale can be played over an aminor backing?
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#2
Any scale can be played over any backing, if it sounds good with it is a different question.
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Last edited by Madzää at Mar 21, 2009,
#3
Meaning an A minor chord? Yes. But A would still be your arrival note, so it would give the feel of A Dorian.
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#4
Quote by turtlewax
Hi,
Am I right in saying that a Gmajor scale can be played over an aminor backing?


in the key of A minor? no, not if you wanted the relative major. Relative major is C.
#5
Quote by Madzää
Any scalce can be played over any backing, if it sounds good with it is a different question.

i agree.

if you mean is Aminor the relative minor of G, no. if you wanted the same notes, you would have to play an A Dorian scale. but yes, you can play anything over G, each one will just sound different.
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#6
no, that would not sound good. to find the relative minor key to a major key you go to the major 6th. that means a G major scale has the same notes as an E natural minor scale. to go from minor to major you find the minor third. the minor third of E natural minor is G, therefore it E natural minor has the same notes as G major. A natural minor has the same notes as C major is you wanted to stick to A minor.
#7
God I hate theory, you can play absolutely anything you want, dont let stupid scales and keys keep telling you what to do, use them as a guidline but whatever sounds good is right!!!
#8
ok, if your playing on G major you can play a GM7, Am7, Bm7, CM7, D7, Em7, F#m7b5, those are the chords for each mode on the G mayor scale. What I do to make a piece or a jam more interesting is to forget the normal chords and invent chords with the scale's notes, meaning that any chord that includes some of these notes G, A, B, C, D, E and F#will be correct(if you use other notes, you'd go off the scale and it won't sound very nice...) .
#9
Quote by Gregray88
God I hate theory, you can play absolutely anything you want, dont let stupid scales and keys keep telling you what to do, use them as a guidline but whatever sounds good is right!!!


yes but knowing what sounds right before you start saves a lot of time, thats the basis of theory.
if i want something to sound 'happy' im much happier just using the major scale that corrosponds to the key im in, rather then trial and error.

Edit: in fact rereading your comment made me angry, people spent hundreds of years compiling their knowledge of music into the theory you hate so much. any retard can pick up a guitar and play random notes for 6 years until he finishes writing what will be a below par song, learning theory allows you to take scales that have been compiled to give and create distinct sounds and moods and write something with purpose.
Last edited by stephen_rettie at Mar 21, 2009,
#10
Quote by Gregray88
God I hate theory, you can play absolutely anything you want, dont let stupid scales and keys keep telling you what to do, use them as a guidline but whatever sounds good is right!!!


Even if you don't know theory and you write a song, it can still be explained perfectly be music theory. Music theory isn't a rule book.
#11
You are right in a sense. Any note that is in a scale can be harmonized into a chord, and then the scale from which it comes takes on a certain character when played over that chord. I have a "modes" lesson in my sig that might help a little.

A lot of guitarists go at it from the opposite direction of this lesson. And, while it is not wrong, I think it makes it harder for "mode newbs" to grasp.
#12
Quote by turtlewax
Hi,
Am I right in saying that a Gmajor scale can be played over an aminor backing?

No it can't.

Your backing is what's defining your tonal centre - therefore any scales you play would be described in terms of how they relate to that tonal centre, in this case A. If you're backing in is in A minor you can't play G anything....you can play the same notes that the G major scale contains, namely G A B C D E F♯ but they'd be described in terms of A, specifically you'd be playing an altered form of A minor with a raised 6th.
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#13
theory...
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#14
Quote by gwitersnamps
Meaning an A minor chord? Yes. But A would still be your arrival note, so it would give the feel of A Dorian.


This is the correct answer
No means maybe
#15
Quote by gwitersnamps
Meaning an A minor chord? Yes. But A would still be your arrival note, so it would give the feel of A Dorian.
No, sorry.

Modes are defined by the tonal center, the note the song is centered around, the note the whole song resolves to.

When there is a chord progression, the chord progression usually defines the tonal center. So if the chord progression is in G major, your song is in G major, regardless of which scale you choose. Using other scales may or may not be "correct," but it certainly will be out of key in some places.

To T/S
Experiment and play whatever you damn want. The only thing I'd suggest above anything else for you to do is to play chord tones on stressed beats. Everything else is free game.
If you're really paranoid about being in key and sounding good, use G major over G major progressions. Nothing will sound more in key than G major, which is good for beginners as they can focus on their phrasing instead of picking the right notes.
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        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
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#16
Quote by demonofthenight
No, sorry.

Modes are defined by the tonal center, the note the song is centered around, the note the whole song resolves to.

When there is a chord progression, the chord progression usually defines the tonal center. So if the chord progression is in G major, your song is in G major, regardless of which scale you choose. Using other scales may or may not be "correct," but it certainly will be out of key in some places.

To T/S
Experiment and play whatever you damn want. The only thing I'd suggest above anything else for you to do is to play chord tones on stressed beats. Everything else is free game.
If you're really paranoid about being in key and sounding good, use G major over G major progressions. Nothing will sound more in key than G major, which is good for beginners as they can focus on their phrasing instead of picking the right notes.



Yes, which is why playing G Major in an A Minor song would sound like A Dorian.
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#17
Yes and no. On paper you can. But when you play it, itll sound more like some form of A (some will tell you dorian, some will just say A minor with an accidental)

Moral of the story. You can play the notes of the G scale, but it wont sound like the G scale
#18
Quote by gwitersnamps
Yes, which is why playing G Major in an A Minor song would sound like A Dorian.

If the backing is A minor, it's going to be A minor, regardless of the melody played over it.

However, if the chords did modulate to A Dorian...
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#19
Quote by SilverDark
If the backing is A minor, it's going to be A minor, regardless of the melody played over it.

However, if the chords did modulate to A Dorian...

I can play Am to Dm as much as I want, playing the G maj scale (with f#) will sound dorian no matter what. I would just have to be careful where I put it.
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#20
Quote by gwitersnamps
I can play Am to Dm as much as I want, playing the G maj scale (with f#) will sound dorian no matter what. I would just have to be careful where I put it.


The point is that there's no reason to drag modes into it at all, since all you're really doing is playing A minor with a natural 6th thrown in. The progression is still tonal, not modal.
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