#1
hey guys ok i know how to harmonize regular notes like A, B, and C you just go up two notes so the Harmony for A would be C and the harmony for E would be G ect. but how do you do sharps and flats will someone please help me o and thanks in advance
Frontbassman sucks in the nicest way possible

Kevin and Kelsey 12-03-2007

#2
Quote by kevin14u2nv
hey guys ok i know how to harmonize regular notes like A, B, and C you just go up two notes so the Harmony for A would be C and the harmony for E would be G ect. but how do you do sharps and flats will someone please help me o and thanks in advance



harmonizing is basically the use of overlaying melodies within any interval and quality.

this means that you can harmonize with any interval be it A to C [minor thirds] or A to F# [Major sixth]

what usually sounds good are modals like the 3rds and 6th's.

but to answer your question a sharp like C# for example, harmonizing by a minor third [we'll go with that] would be just E natural, first folowing the major scale of the note and then flatting the third which would make it minor.


so you basically have to have just a very tiny bit of theory power when it comes to harmonizing, or you could always just figure things out on your own.

i hope this has helped.
Edit: by theory power, in terms of harmonizing knowledge of intervals and the major scale help out greatly.
Member #40 of the Steve Irwin Memorial Club, pm Clincher09 to join.
Last edited by nivlarama at Mar 21, 2009,
#3
just go two whole steps up, ex C# (D#) (E# also known as) Fb.
Smart Pothead and Proud
#4
You can harmonize in straight major thirds or minor thirds or with some other interval.

In which case if you were harmonizing in major thirds and were on A you would go up two whole steps (four half steps) to find the major third which would be C#.

If you were harmonizing in minor thirds and were on A you would go up one whole and one half step (three half steps) to find the minor third which would be C.

Or you could harmonize in diatonic thirds. This means that you would stick to the notes of the scale/key you are in to find the notes. Some will be major and some will be minor.

For example if you were in the key of A major and your melody used the notes
A C# D E then you would write out the A major scale A B C# D E F# G# A and move up two notes from each melody note using notes ONLY from the A major scale to find the harmony notes for your melody.

A would be harmonized with C# (a major third)
C# would be harmonized with E (a minor third)
D would be harmonized with F# (a major third)
E would be harmonized with G# (a major third)
Si
#5
Quote by 36mikeyb36
just go two whole steps up, ex C# (D#) (E# also known as) Fb.


No, you should learn about intervals. My first guitar explained harmonizing to me as playing a certain ammount of frets above or below a note. I then quit taking lessons from him.
#6
Quote by 36mikeyb36
just go two whole steps up, ex C# (D#) (E# also known as) Fb.



you're wrong. E# is enharmonically the same as F
Member #40 of the Steve Irwin Memorial Club, pm Clincher09 to join.
#7
First off, there are 3 semitones between A and C, same with E and G.

Goes like this: G# or Ab/ A / A# or Bb / B / C / C# or Db / D / D# or Eb / E / F / F# or Gb / G

After each slash, it's the next fret. Notice the lack of accidentals on B-C, E-F?

That's because B#=C and Cb=B, same with E and F

Now you go to the major scale in A if you are playing in A btw, (A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G)
If you wanted to harmonize this you could use any of these notes as a root note for your harmony (depending on where you start your riff)
No means maybe
Last edited by pilgrimevan at Mar 21, 2009,