#1
I have learned the Natural Minor, Harmonic Minor, Phrygian, Lydian, Minor Pentatonic, and Major pentatonic scales. I prefer playing Metal, preferably Power Metal/Epic Metal (Rhapsody of Fire, Luca Turilli). But i also like playing ballads, like Sonata Arctica's Shamandalie or Tallulah.

So now i am looking for the names (and maybe even links to useful sites, if you have them) of essential scales both used in basic guitar playing and scales used in metal and especially power metal.

Also, i want to know how to jam along with a song. According to a site called worldguitar.com, the key is the starting chord of the song. For example, take Sonata Arctica's Mary Lou. I know it starts in Dm, because i have read that in a tab. When i went playing the Natural Minor in D, it didn't sound very well. I know that if the song is in minor, you need to play a minor scale and if it is in major, you need to play a major scale. How do you decide what 'key' to play in, and how do you change positions along with the chords? Take, for example, this lesson on guitarmasterclass: http://www.guitarmasterclass.net/solo-guitar/power-metal-soloing-lesson/

Okay.. so, he uses the minor scale but he moves around all of the fretboard. I play within the scale pattern, how do i get out of that? Also, the chords keep changing but he stays within the same scale. Doesn't he ever have to move to a different key? WHEN in a song DO you have to move to a different key?
Last edited by robinlint at Mar 22, 2009,
#2
99% of Western music is based in the major and minor scales. Read the crusade articles (in the columns section) and make sure you understand the theory behind them before moving on to anything else.
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#3
Wow. Those articles are very helpful. Now i have learned intervals and how to construct chords with them. Thanks!
#4
And soon you will learn how the single patterns you've learned are not really scales as such, but rather a small part of a larger scale pattern. Most of the scales we uses in western music contain 5 or 7 notes, that's all...they just repeat all over the fretboard on the guitar. When you see a guitarist running up and down the neck they're usually only playing one scale, it's just that every scale exists all over the fretboard.
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#5
Archeo is right.

Scales are best seen as a way to map intervals for easier communication and explanation on note choices.

You should learn intervals, and you won't be bound by staying diatonic, and will understand exactly what notes on what chords will imply which harmonies you make.

Scales is just easier to say then for example; "x" artist likes to use the notes; C, D, Eb, F, G over "X" chord, or something like that.

But ye Crusades articles go in depth on that.

Knowing intervals will help so much in every aspect of ur writing/soloing.

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#6
Yup, scales are the big picture, they give you an overview of how something is going to sound in context, which notes are going to be in key and which ones aren't and by association which intervals you're likely to want make use of.

In practice though you'll generally just be more concerned with how the next note is going to sound in relation to the one you just played. Your chords give you your framework, the scale tells you what's avaialable to you and how it'll work but ultimately it's your choice of intervals that defines what you create.
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#7
EDIT: Moved to a seperate thread
Last edited by robinlint at Mar 22, 2009,
#8
Okay.. so, he uses the minor scale but he moves around all of the fretboard. I play within the scale pattern, how do i get out of that?


Watch my theory vids.

Also, the chords keep changing but he stays within the same scale. Doesn't he ever have to move to a different key?


All those chords come from that single scale.

WHEN in a song DO you have to move to a different key?


When the song moves to a new key.
#9
To recap on what i have so far learned: I know that there are certain formulas of intervals you can use to construct chords, and that in the C major scale to get a C chord you just play the scale from the note you want (C), skip a note, pick the note, skip a note, pick a note. Then you have three notes, which build either a major or minor chord, depending on the note you started on. But when you want to play another chord in the C major scale, for example, an E chord you skip a part of the C major scale until the E and from the E you just continue the pattern and pick the three notes. I know that if you reach the octave you just continue as if it were the start, and to build a 7th chord you pick four notes instead of three. That's as far as i've learned. Have i missed anything? How do i apply this to my playing now? All i've learned is how to construct chords and the major scale. How do i apply this to the boxed scales i've learned? Things such as natural minor, lydian, phrygian, harmonic minor..
#10
Again, don't learn the boxed shapes. For example, harmonic minor in the key of E:

E F# G A B C D#

This means that that EVERY single note, which is one of the above, anywhere on the fretboard is a part of the scale. The 7th fret of the A-string is an E. The open E strings are E's (duh), the 12th frets of both E-strings are E's. The second fret of the D string is an E.

You see what I'm trying to get at here? Learn the notes on the fretboard instead of boxed shapes, it'll be more helpful. Of course, the above applies to any scale.
#11
Thanks for the response. So, what you mean is learn the intervals of the harmonic minor instead of the boxed shape, just as i have learned the major scale intervals?

Edit: Next question moved to seperate thread
Last edited by robinlint at Mar 22, 2009,
#12
Not of just the harmonic minor scale, but EVERY scale that you know as a boxed shape. The boxes can only take you so far.