#1
Hi guys,

I'm posting this question for a friend of mine, who doesn't speak English well enough to be on UG. So my friend has a tube amp and he wants to know if he should buy a multi-fx processor or buy single pedals. The guy at the guitar shop apparently told him the multi-fx wouldn't go to well with a tube amp. So what do you guys reckon?

Cheers
#2
Good rule of thumb is singles. Purer tone, plus if something fails you can remove the component individually.

However, that's much more expensive. The lure of multi-fx is convenience and price.

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#3
Quote by BaffAttack
Good rule of thumb is singles. Purer tone, plus if something fails you can remove the component individually.

However, that's much more expensive. The lure of multi-fx is convenience and price.


Thanks for the fast response. Apparently the argument was, that single pedals are analog, resulting in them not taking any of the tube amp tone quality away. The multi-fx would make it sounds a bit flat.
#4
Not all single pedals are analog, but yes, in general that's a decent pro to singles.

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#6
Many pedals are digital, and analog singles are normally pricier but imo, they're so more worth it. You can dial a purer tone and you basically tighten up your amplifier's tone rather than just modulating it to a whole new yet processed tone.
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#7
Tone is tied directly to your wallet.If you can afford $150+ per pedal, by all means go individual, but if your going to load up on all the $50 digitech variety you may as well get a POD XT Live or above. Cheaper and better then the low cost digital pedals in my opinion.
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#8
yeah it's true that multi-fx would make the sounds a bit flat, but that doesn't necessarily mean it will sound bad. i get some awesome tones from my ME-50.

it's just a little different. i think the boss multi-fx are amazing. you can't argue with all the features you're getting for the price.
#9
Quote by JohnFrusciante6
yeah it's true that multi-fx would make the sounds a bit flat, but that doesn't necessarily mean it will sound bad. i get some awesome tones from my ME-50.

it's just a little different. i think the boss multi-fx are amazing. you can't argue with all the features you're getting for the price.



I agree with this totally. got a Boss GT-10, and ive had it for about 2 months, and im only just discovering some of the stuff you can do with it. You get sooooo much with it. A bunch of OD/DS pedals models, About 40 different FX (which can be combined 2 at a time), around 30-35 preamp models(which sound great when combined with the pedal models), an expression pedal for wah/whammy/volume change, EZ tone (which is amazing imo) which lets you create tones based on what you play, an EQ, a tuner, and a whole bunch of other stuff. I honestly love it and i use it every single day.
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Last edited by John5rules125 at Mar 22, 2009,
#10
Mutlis are nice for total tonal changes midsong. Thats why i use mine.

About tone, most Multis can be adjusted to be pretty much transparent to the signal. Then you can add all the crazy effects on top of that.

It takes some tinkering, but its well worth it in the end.
#12
I have a friend with a Mesa Boogie Mark III and Les Paul that ruins his sound with a multi-effect. Other than a simple distortion, no matter what he does he just sounds digital, overprocessed and definitely loses dynamics and responsiveness when he turns on his multi-effect. I agree with those that say getting a single purpose pedal for each effect you want is the best way to go.

The advantages to a multi are price and versatility. Some people do not mind the digital sound, so for many people they work great. But in my opinion they ruin sound.
Maybe he could borrow one for a bit to find what effects he wants, and if he likes the tone. The guitar shop by me allows a 30 day exchange on pedals, which I think is great. Maybe he could find a shop that has a generous return policy and he could check it out for himself.
#13
Do multi-fx work well with further pedals down the line? I'd like to get some sort of effects, and the ME-50 and the RP500 seem like a really good deal (although I've got no idea which to get). My amp is definitely not the best and as such I'm not that worried about the tone reduction, I doubt it will be noticeable. However, if further down the line I want to get a specialist pedal for a particular band, would I be ok to put that in the same loop as the multi-effects unit?
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#14
Single-pedals is usually better for most people.

1) If you know what you're doing, you can get better tone.
2) Ease of use
3) Cheaper, unless you use like 20 effects.
#15
Thanks for the help guys. As far as I know he was debating on getting a Boss GT-10 (which is what I have aswell - love it ) and when he went to check it out at the shop that was the stuff they clerk told him.
#16
for the most part, people don't mind so much using multi fx for modulation effects, etc. But for things like overdrives, distortions, fuzzes, clean boosts etc. most people are pickier and will go for stomp boxes.
#17
Whoever was comparing RP500 and ME-50, just from experiance, the ME-50 is the way to go. BOSS actually makes great multi fx pedals
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#18
Hmm te way I see it is if you are buying a GT-10, TC Electronics Multi FX or an Axe FX then get those but if not buy the single pedals.
#19
it really depends on the pedals you are using. a few good single pedals will blow a cheap multi-fx out of the water. however if you are getting extremely cheap single pedals, an inexpensive multi-fx is probably going to be better. if you have a couple thousand dollars to spend, the best idea is to get a combination of both.

i think the biggest downfal of multi-fx is that people use the box as their whole tone. they use amp models and digital distortions in front of an amp, and that can really muddy up the sound. combined with the poor a-d and d-a converters in most inexpensive m-fx and youve got a recipe for poor tone. now if you were instead to use your amps distortion and a good analog od/dist pedal and then use the m-fx in the effects loop for just modulation effects, then you can get a much better tone out of the same box.

m-fx are great for people starting out to see what effects they like. then they are also good for people who know exactly what they are doing with their gear and can set up a nice m-fx pedal to do exactly what they want. something like a g-major or g-force unit in combination with a good amp and a couple analog pedals is a great setup, and i would rather use that instead of a full single pedal setup.
#20
MultiFX do fine with tube amps. Your friend should decide based on his needs. Does he want to spend a lot of time experimenting with tones and various FX? If so then a multifx is a good decision. Does he want a drum machine to practice with? If so then many multifx have drum machines. I always say if you have to ask the question then quality of tone probably isn't your biggest issue. If he's a beginner then even the best pedal isn't going to sound all that great.

The advantage of separate pedals is largely simplicity. It's unlikely that a beginner is going to spend many hundreds of dollars buying the best pedals. And if he did he would likely be disappointed because if you can't play well, then uber expensive pedals aren't cost effective.
Last edited by fly135 at Mar 22, 2009,