#1
I've had this question for a while. I learned the major scale using the 5 box method, where there are 5 seperate boxes, with the root in different starting places. Thus, when I solo in a key, I have no idea what notes I'm hitting, I visualize the boxes, and then play notes which I think might sound well from previous experience. Now, this has a few setbacks. One, I am not able to play what I'm thinking on the spot (aka, I can't go, "oh! an A would go well after this C", I just have to randomly guess that this one note in my box will sound well. Two, I am somewhat constrained by these boxes, I have a difficult time "leaping" more than 1 of these boxes at a time.

Now, my question to the experienced players is this: how do you guys visualize your fretboard?

Do you know what all the notes are, and then know what note sounds good after the one you played? I'd assume this would cause lots of lag time looking for each note, but then again, everything improves with practice.

Do you hear intervals? If you don't know the names of the notes, do you play according to how they sound? Aka, "wow, a maj3rd would be a good interval right now".

I'm feeling stifled by these boxes, and all my soloing sounds similar now because I keep doing the same patterns. If someone has experienced this and found something better, please let me know. Thanks!
#2
I think of what i hear in my head, and try to play it, relating to the patterns of course.

To spice things up, i also throw in some fast licks and stuff, or do something out of the ordinary that i rarely do, like skipping a string or doing insane stretch to reach a note or something. Doing stuff that i'm uncomfortabe with.
Last edited by wokketywok at Mar 22, 2009,
#3
I hear intervals - the boxes are just a means to an end. If you just learned the patterns without really paying attention to the notes they contained or the sounds that you can make with them then yes, you're going to struggle.

You just have to spend some time learning more about the scale and getting more familiar with the important apsects - when it comes to the crunch with scales where you put your fingers isn't actually all that important...it's just that little bit of information you need right at the end of everything else when it comes to actually putting things into practice.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Mar 22, 2009,
#4
Quote by fnmpm
I've had this question for a while. I learned the major scale using the 5 box method, where there are 5 seperate boxes, with the root in different starting places. Thus, when I solo in a key, I have no idea what notes I'm hitting, I visualize the boxes, and then play notes which I think might sound well from previous experience. Now, this has a few setbacks. One, I am not able to play what I'm thinking on the spot (aka, I can't go, "oh! an A would go well after this C", I just have to randomly guess that this one note in my box will sound well. Two, I am somewhat constrained by these boxes, I have a difficult time "leaping" more than 1 of these boxes at a time.

Now, my question to the experienced players is this: how do you guys visualize your fretboard?

Do you know what all the notes are, and then know what note sounds good after the one you played? I'd assume this would cause lots of lag time looking for each note, but then again, everything improves with practice.

Do you hear intervals? If you don't know the names of the notes, do you play according to how they sound? Aka, "wow, a maj3rd would be a good interval right now".

I'm feeling stifled by these boxes, and all my soloing sounds similar now because I keep doing the same patterns. If someone has experienced this and found something better, please let me know. Thanks!



Your not stifled by the boxes, you simply have alot more to learn. Don't stop at one piece of information and call it a "method", and then blame it for your lack of progress. You've learned some scale shapes, great.... now it's time to move on by learning new things to broaden your perspective.


Heres some things you can try:

- learn solos/melodies
* learn to hear the notes in those patterns in a musical context through actual experience

- study theory
*this takes time but it will help you to make sense of what is going on


- learn the notes on the neck
It will be easier to apply your knowledge to the guitar if you know the fret-board well


- Learn to read

* standard notation is the language that music theory is taught in. Being fluent in this language is crucial for a deep understanding of music thoery.

* learning to read standard notation in all position on the guitar will solidify your knowledge of the notes on the neck as you encounter them in a musical context.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 22, 2009,