#1
I don't think this is normal for a guitar, but when I strum my high E string, the A string starts to vibrate and make a high pitched but quite noise.

If I strum my B string, the Low E string starts vibrating and making a high pitched but quite noise and Vice Versa for both problems stated above


What's wrong with my guitar?

Oh, and I changed the strings around 2weeks ago.
#2
Nothing is wrong, that's just the way the vibration works. Certain string frequencies cause other frequencies to ring out as well. It does mean your guitar is in tune with it self though. There's nothing you can really do about it. If you listen to live professional players you can hear it sometimes.
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#3
Quote by Artemis Entreri
Nothing is wrong, that's just the way the vibration works. Certain string frequencies cause other frequencies to ring out as well. It does mean your guitar is in tune with it self though. There's nothing you can really do about it. If you listen to live professional players you can hear it sometimes.

Yessir. It is most likely sympathetic vibration. The cure is learning to mute the strings you want to stay quiet.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Mar 22, 2009,
#4
That is actually quite natural. When you hear a note... lets say you strum an E... that sound is actually composed of more than just the frequency that makes that E note. The sound is primarily made of the E note frequency, but its harmonic notes are actually being created as well.

These harmonic sounds are called "overtones" and are what makes each instrument sound unique from each other. It's why a piano and a guitar sound different even though they are playing the same note in the same octave--different overtones are accented more/less in each instrument. The amount of secondary vibrations(overtones) are what determines the timbre(quality of the sound) and determines the sound of the instrument.

In a nut shell, it's normal for other strings to vibrate. Those vibrations are just the harmonic overtones of the primary note.

DISCLAIMER: I haven't studied this stuff since grade 8 or 9, so forgive me if I'm mixing up words or using the wrong words to describe what I'm saying. Hopefully, I'm using the right words.
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#6
Sympathetic vibration can be harnessed for musical reasons. For example say you wanted, or the music demanded, that an open b string ring on but the string is immediately needed for subsequent notes that would cause the desired b to stop sounding. In this case you can purposely create an overtone somewhere else when the b is first sounded, say by merely fretting the 2nd fret 5th string. The b overtone generated there would then ring on in the 5th string and so free the second string for other notes. This sort of trick is very useful in contrapuntal music.