#1
I'm sorry if this sort of thread was made already but I must know.


I recently noticed a Roland GR20 in a YouTube video and I see that it gives a guitar player a lot of possibilities for sound.

I would like to know if getting this pedal instead of a guitar over the summer is worth it.
I'm planning on looking for it in Guitar Center and giving it a try soon but I'd like some prior knowledge too.
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#2
i'm not digging the sounds out of the gr20, plus, it's expensive.

i'd probably invest in the new guitar OR a boss gt-10.
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#3
It does give you a lot of possibilities, but may not use a lot of them. I bought a GT-10 because of the "possibilities." I only use very few of the features. I use preamps, overdrives, compressor, delays, and reverb. I thought I would use a lot of the effects, but I don't. The novelty will wear off and you'll be stuck with the ugly GK-3 on your guitar and $700 that you could've spent elsewhere.
#4
Hmm, so what if I got a Sanpera II pedal instead?
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#5
If you were planning on spending that much on the GR-20, I would recommend something to improve your tone instead of the Sanpera II
#6
Quote by JELIFISH19
If you were planning on spending that much on the GR-20, I would recommend something to improve your tone instead of the Sanpera II



If I get a Sanpera II I'm also getting another guitar so it's either

Roland GR20 or Sanpera II AND another guitar $500-$600
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#7
For $800, I would just get a new amp. You could sell the Vypyr and get an even better amp. You could get a new guitar, but I can't really recommend spending more money on you're Vypyr. It will be the weak point of your rig if you get a new guitar. Once you upgrade it, you probably won't use it.

I see you're from New York, if you want to go used, I'm actually selling my Epi G-400 with 2 Dirty Fingers and a Digitech RP-80, PM me for details if your interested
#8
I had a gr-20 technically two
It may have been bad luck but both of the ones i had were crap tracking on the gk3 pup and i had to return it
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#9
The GR-20 is a different kind of animal and doesn't do what a lot of people think it should.

Let me give you a quick overview:

1) The GK-3 pickup for non-synth access guitars gets mixed reviews and a majority of them are not favorable.

2) You will soon realize that you need a good synth access guitar to get decent tracking, so a decent quality one will run you at least $700 (Godin has the best Synth Access guitars I have found). I am using a Godin xtSA which runs new close to $1000 if you can find one, they are fairly common in Canada. Basically you will just toss the GK-3. Still, the tracking is limited, the lower the frequency the more latency you will experience. 1/32 notes Allegro are not going to track well with a majority of the patches, some patches start crapping out at 1/16 notes Moderato. You won't be shredding a Sitar sound for sure.

3) Learning the GR-20 is not for the faint of heart, you will be messing around with the patches to set up your own. Then you will get frustrated because you can only edit starting out with the patches already in the unit, there are 469 of those organized in 10 banks, the 11th bank is where you save your edited patches for recall.

4) The main use I have found for the unit is to fill out rhythm parts with additional orchestration. The novelty of sounding like a banjo gets old fast. It also is a great tool for composition and creating arrangements.

5) Trying to use the synth volume pedal with the glide or hold while standing on stage is pretty much impossible.

6) The actual physical unit does not seem to be robust enough for live performance, I haven't broken it yet, but you can't put your weight on it like a Crybaby.

7) The MIDI is an interesting feature that I am still working on using effectively so I can't comment on it.

8) It is a fully digital device, try it with your amp (all channels) before purchase or you may find you need a new amp as well. For example, it is the one thing that works with a Marshall MG100DFX (solid state digital piece of crap), but if I have it through the Vibrato on my Fender Twin Reverb, there are some serious issues.

Summary or TLDR version:

Expensive toy for someone who has time to play with it. Has uses, but it can be limited. It is a true synthesizer, not an effects pedal.