#1
Okay...after learning a few scales and some chords IE. Major, Minor, Sharp, Sharp Minor, 7th's and some power chords along with only one song : /

What do i do now when i practice? Learn more chords and scales? finger excersices?

All help is greatly appreciated
#2
Learn songs that use those chords or make up your own.

It's a great form of actually using them instead of just learning them.

And by sharp, sharp minor chords, what do you mean?
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Quote by DiminishedFifth
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I got meself a self-approving sig. Kick. Ass.
#4
Here are some ideas for what you could do :

- Practise bends, hammer ons and pull offs, and slides
- Practise at least 2 hours a day if poss. It doesnt matter what you practise, just make sure that your hands always feel strong and flexible by constantly playing
- Make sure that you know all of the greek modes and pentatonic scale patterns in all positions
- Very useful : Devise exercises based on scales...

...example :

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 - normal, straight scale

1,2,3, 2,3,4, 3,4,5, 4,5,6, 5,6,7, 6,7,8
1,3, 2,4, 3,5, 4,6, 5,7, 6,8
1,2,4, 2,3,5, 3,4,6, 4,5,7, 5,6,8
1,3,4, 2,4,5, 3,5,6, 4,6,7, 5,7,8

In other words, become extremely familiar with the look and feel of the scale pattern by playing all over it. I did this and it helped me with my improvising a lot. Its also very good for confidence. It eventually helps you to "see" music on the fretboard.
Last edited by leafarmusic at Mar 24, 2009,
#5
There is no such thing as sharp and sharp minor chords. You got confused, lol. The chords shown in the lesson are D# C# F#, etc. major and minor chords. D# is a note, just like C and E.

When you see a # next to a note, you play that note a fret higher. If you see a (b) flat sign, you play that note a fret lower.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
It's like you read my mind!

I got meself a self-approving sig. Kick. Ass.
#6
Just to elaborate on what silverdark said, for example, C sharp is the note thats a semitone above C, and E flat is a semitone below E. Im not sure if you already know this, but there you go.