#1
I'm not asking for a method for me. I am writing my first one and i realized I just jumped into it and played what felt right as opposed to applying any theory I know, which is limited, and it's really liberating. So, how do you do it?
Last edited by Valid12891 at Mar 22, 2009,
#3
I just jump into it with what I think feels right.
Ibanez SR505

EBS MultiComp
BOSS GEB-7

Ampeg SVT 4-Pro
Ampeg SVT 810E
#4
I seem to use my theory subconciously(sp?) when writing solos. I just play what feels right but I do notice that I use the theory that i do know without really thinking about it. lots of pentatonic stuff with some chromatics and bending thrown in usually.
dean edge one 5 string
Schecter studio-4
Samick fairlane-6
Ibanez sb900
Ibanez btb775
Fender p bass special deluxe

Dean Del Sol
Ibanez prestige rg2610

Peavey TKO 65
Peavey vb-2
Quote by the_perdestrian
listen to revelation, for he is wise in the way of bass-fu
#5
I will admit I am talking from a jazz perspective, but knowing what scales apply to what chord structures help a great deal in creating applicable solos.
#6
I usually improv over theory, incorporate chromatic steps into scales, make weird jumps that aren't usually expected but sound good, occasionally I will actually have a solo written and rehearsed, but I like to improv more, let's me be me more than rehearsed solos. I somewhat follow chord changes, but it all depends on the song. I don't get to solo often because the people I usually jam with are show stealers. But improv is the way for me. Works well in blues music, not so much in ska.
Gear:1991 Fender MIJ Jazz/Squier VM Fretless Jazz -> Pitchblack -> Way Huge Green Rhino -> Boss OC-2 -> Boss DD-7 -> Markbass Tube 800 -> SWR 4x12.

Flat wounds. Flat wounds on everything. Everything is a little fatter when it's flatter.
#7
first rule- not too long- bass solos are often rather repetitive
second- you still must be locked in the beat, in some manner.
third- try to be funky and catchy. most good solos are that way anyway, on bass, it should be more so.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#8
My solos aren't really solos, but just bass leads. I normally write/play songs that are typical, so to me it seems like a solo when everything is kind of toned down and it is me taking the sort of center role.
Lord Gold feeds from your orifices and he wants to see you sweat.
Lord Gold probes you publicly and makes your pussy wet.
Now say his name.....
#9
Quote by lordofthefood1
My solos aren't really solos, but just bass leads. I normally write/play songs that are typical, so to me it seems like a solo when everything is kind of toned down and it is me taking the sort of center role.

bass intros are usually way better than a normal bass solo, fills are great too. the bass is the underlying current, the Id of the music, usually when that gets completely exposed and out there, it should be either for a few seconds or as a construction style part where, one instrument starts, another joins, then another (Hysteria-Muse? anyone?). of course, there are always exceptions, but in most cases that seems to get better results.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#10
Sing, sing with the notes of your instrument. Let the notes speak, say what you have to say, not too brief, not to long, be deep but not pretentious, play melodies that sing from your heart and complement the music and the music complements your melodies, SING.
#11
Mostly mixolydian to pentatonic to minor 7th and of course the blues scale. Most of my solo's are more jazzy-ish then anything though as rock doesn't call, to me, for a bass solo, just lots of fills, nice intro's and space. Chromatic scales are also very important, but learn which notes don't sound great, like, if there was a minor 7th chord on the guitar, you wouldn't want to linger on a major 3rd.
#12
I play what ever comes to mind with the changes and melody going in the back of my head somewhere.